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This is a typical producer/consumer pattern using VS 2010 concurent queue, the problem is that when I run the program, the memory consumption hit over 1GB then the program crashes, can someone please point out the issue in this code?

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdlib> 
#include <ctime> 

#include <boost\shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <boost\thread.hpp>
#include <concurrent_queue.h>



void wait2(int milliseconds)
{
    boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(milliseconds)); 
}

class CQueue
{
    Concurrency::concurrent_queue<int>  Q;

    boost::mutex                m;
    boost::condition_variable   cv;

public:

    CQueue():QValue(-1)
    {
    }

    int QRead()
    {
        while(Q.empty())
        {
            boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lk(m);
            cv.wait(lk);
        }

        int res;
        if(Q.try_pop(res))
        {
            QValue = res;
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    void QWrite(int i)
    {
        Q.push(i);
        cv.notify_one();
    }

    int QValue;
};

CQueue myqueue;

void write()
{
    int i = 0;
    while(true)
    {
        myqueue.QWrite(++i);
    }
}


void read()
{
    while(true)
    {
        if( myqueue.QRead())
            std::cout << myqueue.QValue << std::endl;
        else
            std::cout << "failed to read" << std::endl;
    }
}
void main ()
{

    boost::thread w(write);
    boost::thread r(read);

    w.join();
    r.join();

}
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1  
No obvious deadlocks. Possibly the writer is simply filling the queue much much faster than the reader can drain it since the reader is performing I/O. –  Casey Jul 23 '13 at 6:05
    
why did you put unique_lock inside a scope, you know that you will read from the queue while the lock is off, right? and why are you doing these things when you have a concurrent_queue already? –  yngum Jul 23 '13 at 6:21
    
@Casey you should have right because generally producer/consumer pattern require to specify capacity (threshold on their input fifo) of each consumer in order to block producer until someone is ready or has storage. –  alexbuisson Jul 23 '13 at 6:57
    
@Casey, the program fails at around 77k insertions which is not huge, so I don't expect tthat to be a problem. –  user327843 Jul 23 '13 at 7:28
    
@yngum, unique_lock and condition_variable are necessary to suspend the thread when the queue is empty to avoid busy cpu. –  user327843 Jul 23 '13 at 7:29

2 Answers 2

I build and tested your code with VS'13 and Boost 1.52 on a simple dual-core.

And as already said, because your producer-consumer design doesn't define a threshold to block the producer when the stock (the concurrent_queue) reach a given level, The producer push too many data in the queue and as consequence the memory increase, windows start swapping, freeze, process can crash if it exceed the max commit size, etc ....

Note that the commit size limit depend of several factor, compiler, compiler option, OS on which your program run, ...

So in the following I added a way to block the Producer if the queue size reach a threshold, and if the queue size goes below the threshold the consumer awake the producer.

With those change, we add some synchronization and that can limit a bit the parallelism, but the in-use memory is under control.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdlib> 
#include <ctime> 

#include "..\..\..\boost\boost\shared_ptr.hpp"
#include "..\..\..\boost\boost\thread.hpp"

#include <concurrent_queue.h>

#define STOCK_THRESHOLD 1000

void wait2(int milliseconds)
{
    boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(milliseconds)); 
}

class CQueue
{
    Concurrency::concurrent_queue<int>  Q;

    boost::mutex                consumerMutex;
    boost::condition_variable   consumerCV;

    boost::mutex                producerMutex;
    boost::condition_variable   producerCV;

public:

    CQueue():QValue(-1)
    {
    }

    int QRead()
    {
        while(Q.empty())
        {
            boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lk(consumerMutex);
            consumerCV.wait(lk);
        }

        int res;
        if(Q.try_pop(res))
        {
            QValue = res;
            if(Q.unsafe_size() <= STOCK_THRESHOLD)
            {
                producerCV.notify_one();
            }
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    void QWrite(int i)
    {
        while(Q.unsafe_size() > STOCK_THRESHOLD){
            boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lk(producerMutex);
            producerCV.wait_for(lk, boost::chrono::milliseconds(10));
        }
        Q.push(i);
        consumerCV.notify_one();
    }

    int QValue;
};

CQueue myqueue;

void write()
{
    int i = 0;
    while(true)
    {
        myqueue.QWrite(++i);

    }
}


void read()
{
    while(true)
    {
        if( myqueue.QRead())
            std::cout << myqueue.QValue << std::endl;
        else
            std::cout << "failed to read" << std::endl;
    }
}

void main ()
{

    boost::thread w(write);
    boost::thread r(read);

    w.join();
    r.join();

}
share|improve this answer

The code loses notifications from your condition variable, so that your consumer thread sleeps for too long and hence is not consuming fast enough.

Imagine conceivable thread sequences:

    Producer                       Consumer
--+-----------------------------+-------------------------------------------------------
1 |                             |  while(Q.empty())
2 |   Q.push(i);                |  boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lk(consumerMutex);
3 |   consumerCV.notify_one();  |
4 |                             |  consumerCV.wait(lk); // notification from 3 gets lost

To fix the mutex must be held while signaling the condition in the producer before consumerCV.notify_one() and while checking the state of the queue in the consumer before Q.empty().

You can easily check that by commenting out all mutex and condition variable calls and changing the consumer to busy-wait like while(Q.empty()) /* busy-wait */;.

If concurrent_queue does not provide a function to wait till an item is available you may be better off using a non-thread safe container wrapped in a mutex lock. Because it still needs a mutex and a condition variable to notify correctly the benefit gained by using a lock-free or wait-free container is lost.

Also, because the producer does only ++i to produce, but the consumer does much more by printing each value, the consumer can not possibly keep up with the producer resulting in a build up of the queue and the eventual memory exhaustion.

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