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I have a test script which has a lot of commands and will generate lots of output, I use set -x or set -v and set -e, so the script would stop when error occurs. However, it's still rather difficult for me to locate which line did the execution stop in order to locate the problem. Is there a method which can output the line number of the script before each line is executed? Or output the line number before the command exhibition generated by set -x? Or any method which can deal with my script line location problem would be a great help. Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You mention that you're already using -x. The variable PS4 denotes the value is the prompt printed before the command line is echoed when the -x option is set and defaults to : followed by space.

You can change PS4 to emit the LINENO (The line number in the script or shell function currently executing).

For example, if your script reads:

$ cat script
foo=10
echo ${foo}
echo $((2 + 2))

Executing it thus would print line numbers:

$ PS4='Line ${LINENO}: ' bash -x script
Line 1: foo=10
Line 2: echo 10
10
Line 3: echo 4
4
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1  
Obviously, this is the answer I wanted, thanks very much –  dspjm Jul 23 '13 at 9:26
    
I wonder why no one mentions this for "How to debug shell scripts?" . This is far better than just echo –  Suvarna Jan 15 at 13:00
    
@VusP Agreed, unnecessary echo statements are best avoided. –  devnull Jan 15 at 13:02

In Bash, $LINENO contains the line number where the script currently executing.

If you need to know the line number where the function was called, try $BASH_LINENO. Note that this variable is an array.

For example:

#!/bin/bash       

function log() {
    echo "LINENO: ${LINENO}"
    echo "BASH_LINENO: ${BASH_LINENO[*]}"
}

function foo() {
    log "$@"
}

foo "$@"

See here for details of Bash variables.

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Simple (but powerful) solution: Place echo around the code you think that causes the problem and move the echo line by line until the messages does not appear anymore on screen - because the script has stop because of an error before.

Even more powerful solution: Install bashdb the bash debugger and debug the script line by line

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