Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I've got a problem with JS code generated by TypeScript compiler. For a class like this:

// Class
export class UserDTO {
    Id: number;
    FirstName: string;
    LastName: string;
    DateOfBirth: Date;

    getFUllName(): string {
        return this.FirstName + ' ' + this.LastName;
    }        
}

TypeScript generates the following code:

define(["require", "exports"], function(require, exports) {
    // Class
    var UserDTO = (function () {
        function UserDTO() {
        }
        UserDTO.prototype.getFUllName = function () {
            return this.FirstName + ' ' + this.LastName;
        };
        return UserDTO;
    })();
    exports.UserDTO = UserDTO;
});
//@ sourceMappingURL=TestClass.js.map

Above code doesn't contains unused (unreferenced) fields but I need them in some 'object-to-object' mapping case'. Is it possible to force compiler to generate them always?

I'm using a TypeScript 0.9.1 from Visual Studio 2012. Here are my compiler options:

<TypeScriptTarget>ES5</TypeScriptTarget>
<TypeScriptIncludeComments>true</TypeScriptIncludeComments>
<TypeScriptSourceMap>true</TypeScriptSourceMap>
<TypeScriptModuleKind>AMD</TypeScriptModuleKind>

Thanks in advance for any hints.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can initialize them when you define them:

export class UserDTO {
    Id: number = 0;
    FirstName: string = '';
    LastName: string = '';
    DateOfBirth: Date = undefined;

    getFUllName(): string {
        return this.FirstName + ' ' + this.LastName;
    }        
}

Generated javascript:

var UserDTO = (function () {
    function UserDTO() {
        this.Id = 0;
        this.FirstName = '';
        this.LastName = '';
        this.DateOfBirth = undefined;
    }
    UserDTO.prototype.getFUllName = function () {
        return this.FirstName + ' ' + this.LastName;
    };
    return UserDTO;
})();

A demo to show looping through such properties.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it's an option - I just assumed that it's possible to auto-initialize them in JavaScript (some compiler switch?). I've checked the code generation specification: typescriptlang.org/Content/… and it seems that only members with assignments are generated. I'll mark your post as an answer if there is no better option. –  krlm Jul 23 '13 at 9:52
    
i assume that (in Javascript) if you set a member to null (e.g. this.FirstName = null) that the member will disappear from the object member bag? Which would make it equivalent not referencing them in the first place? –  Ian Boyd Aug 8 '13 at 0:50

You don't need to declare fields in JavaScript. TypeScript's field declarations are used for type checking only. You can still access your fields with compiled code as well.

var o = new UserDTO();
o.FirstName = 'John';
o.LastName = 'Doe';
console.log(o.getFUllName()); // "John Doe"

fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/nPr6f/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.