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I try to play with node.js and I find interesting (maybe, just for me) thing I write some code like this:

var flag = false;
doSomethingAsync().on('complete', function(data) {
    console.log('from callback');
    //do somestuff
    flag = true;
});
do{
   // there I want to wait for callback result
}while(!flag);

But I observed that I don't see log from callback. Why does this happen? I tried to change do...while for another loops, but observed the same behaviour
Note: I know that it's inappropriate way to something in node, but I want to understand why this happens

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3 Answers

Node implements a cooperative I/O-loop, where checks on whether I/O has to be performed are run only when the program is idle (not performing any calculations); the cooperative part is implemented by the developer not blocking the I/O-loop by performing blocking calculations.

The problem with a do-while loop (which doesn't contain any I/O operations itself) is that it prevents the program to go idle, and therefore effectively blocking any I/O — including that performed by doSomethingAsync — from being performed.

This can be mitigated somewhat by using setImmediate(), although this can't be used as-in in a do-while loop.

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Never do this, whatever the language.

If you don't release the CPU, you can't easily predict how the engine will handle the other tasks you launch. It may decide to give all resources to this loop and not let doSomethingAsync do any progress, thus making the loop endless and the callback never fired.

In nodejs specifically, as there is only one thread to execute your javascript code (even if other threads are here for the IO), the callback won't be started until your loop ends (which it won't do).

Simply do what you need inside the callback or in a function you call from the callback :

function goon() {
   // do other stuff
}

doSomethingAsync().on('complete', function(data) {
    console.log('from callback');
    //do somestuff
    goon();
});
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I think the point of the question is more about why the "complete" even never fires. Agree that a spin lock is probably not a good idea. –  Steve Haigh Jul 23 '13 at 8:46
    
@SteveHaigh And that's exactly what I answered. –  dystroy Jul 23 '13 at 8:47
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What you are doing is called busy waiting/looping. It wastes your CPU processing time. This is a bad practice in all languages, not just in node.

What makes it really bad in node, is that it locks up the event loop. In event loop, each event handler is given CPU processing, which it uses and must release the control at the end. When you run an infinite loop, it blocks execution of next event, and the event loop itself.

So in your case flag cannot be set to true, to end the loop. because loop must allow for flag to change.

var flag = false;
setTimeout(function(data) {
    console.log('from callback');
    flag = true;
},2000);
i=0;
do{
   i +=1;
   console.log(i);
}while(!flag&&i<200);

Your flag will only change when the loop ends.

See this article

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