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I have two fragments, MyFirst fragment and MySecond fragment. MySecond fragment extends from MyFirst fragment.

classed are like this:

public class MyFirstFragment extends Fragment {
        @Override
        public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) { 
        ...                
        }

        @Override
        public void onActivityCreated(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
            super.onActivityCreated(savedInstanceState);
        ...
            // Check view and map, request to recreate if each of them is null
            if(MyFirstFragment.this.getView() == null  ||  googleMap == null) {
                Toast.makeText(getActivity().getApplicationContext(), R.string.my_message, Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
                return;
            }
        }
    }

public class MySecondFragment extends MyFirstFragment {
        @Override
        public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) { 
        ...
        }

        @Override
        public void onActivityCreated(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
            super.onActivityCreated(savedInstanceState);
        ...
        }
    }

My problem is super.onActivityCreated(savedInstanceState); in onActivityCreated() method of MySecondFragment calls its super. Since I want to hide functionality of this method in super class (Which is not useful for this fragment) I have added onActivityCreated() method in MySecondFragment.

The problem is if I remove this line then I have run-time error that throws "SuperNotCalledException".

What you think? seems I have to extend Fragment class instead of extending MyFirstFragment. I have some variables in MyFirstFragment that I need them in MySecondFragment.

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand why you want to remove that line? Does it cause any trouble? – Caner Jul 23 '13 at 8:56
    
He wants to hide the functionality inside the parent fragment. Try removing the whole method onActivityCreated from MySecondFragment. – Mcingwe Jul 23 '13 at 8:59
    
@Caner, As you can see there is a Toast message in super method. Then displays in second fragment which should not display. That Toast message belongs to first fragment not second one. – Hesam Jul 23 '13 at 9:00
    
Debug. Put a breakpoint in SecondFragment's onActivityCreated, be 100% sure its hitting that line – Flynny75 Jul 23 '13 at 9:05
    
If you override, you need to call super(). For you, super() comes from 1st Fragment. Why do you NOT expect the Toast? – Mcingwe Jul 23 '13 at 9:18
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can write a new Function testFunction(Bundle savedInstanceState) in your MyFirstFragment in which call super.onActivityCreated(savedInstanceState);

And in your MySecondFragment's onActivityCreated call this testFunction(Bundle savedInstanceState) rather than super.onActivityCreated(savedInstanceState); i.e.

in MyFirstFragment

testFunction(Bundle savedInstanceState){
    super.onActivityCreated(savedInstanceState);
}

in MySecondFragment

public void onActivityCreated(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.testFunction(savedInstanceState);
...
}

i don't clearly understand your basic requirment to bypass the MyFirstFragment's onActivityCreated but you can do this way.

share|improve this answer
    
Works fine, nice solution although I'm not sure is a clean way. But works, thank you ;) – Hesam Jul 24 '13 at 0:39

You need to call the Fragment's implementation regardless. If you don't want to call MyFirstFragment's implementation there's a few solutions:

  1. The cleanest one, give MyFirstFragment and MySecondFragment a common ancestor, which will be pretty much MyFirstFragment , except for onActivityCreated(). Both activities will inherit directly from it.

  2. call super, but add a variable to the bundle to let MyFirstFragment know that its implementation is not to be called this time.

  3. Just extend Fragment in MySecondFragment

share|improve this answer

You should always call the super method. Just set the variables you need in the MySecondFragment.onActivityCreated() method and use them afterwards. To hide functionality you can always check the calling object class but this goes against the OOP inheritance principles.

share|improve this answer
    
but it IS calling super. SecondFragment calls to super.onActivityCreated, which is FirstFragment's onActivityCreated, which in turn also calls super.onActivityCreated, which goes up to the Fragment. – Flynny75 Jul 23 '13 at 9:04
    
As far as I can understand, the OP does not want to call super.onActivityCreated(), because of some code that should not be run for MySecondFragment.onActivityCreated(). So he either needs to run the code only if the calling object's class is MyFirstFragment, or as mick88 pointed out, the best solution is to have both MyFirstFragment and MySecondFragment inherit a common abstract ancestor that has the common code in his onActivityCreated() and the subclasses should implement their specific code in their onActivityCreated() methods – tkolev Jul 23 '13 at 11:44

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