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In C or C++, I want to know stack frame size of a thread or process. Could anybody tell me the number of stack frames for a thread or process? I am getting crash in a function "p" when "p" function is called from "q" and "q" is called from "r". In function "r" statically some variable are declared of size more than 34000 bytes.

but this crash is removed When i declare that same variable dynamically.

that's why a asked these questions to know the reasons for crash.

any way thanks for all type of comments.

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marked as duplicate by Cody Gray, eznme, EJP, Mats Petersson, Mitch Wheat Jul 23 '13 at 10:22

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Totally compiler-dependent. –  Suhosin Jul 23 '13 at 9:36
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It depends on OS and Compiler, not a language standard –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 23 '13 at 9:36
    
    
For C++11 std::threads, see also stackoverflow.com/questions/13871763/… ; otherwise, "# of stack frames" depends on each frame's local variables before calling deeper. Kilobytes is more useful: for a ballpark figure, why not create a function that allocates say 16k for a local array, writes out something, then calls itself? Count writes before the crash. There's may be some compiler switches or runtime parameters you can use to tune it, but it may depend on the threading library used, as well as the compiler, OS etc.. –  Tony D Jul 23 '13 at 9:46
    
under linux you can usually input the command ulimit -s to know how big your stack can be ( in kbyte ), and usually the value it's 8192, so around 8Mb, but you can even remove this limit and set an unlimited stack. It depends, usually you don't want to do much stuff on the stack because it can always be problematic, it's better to allocate things on the heap, limit the use of the recursion and use references and pointers without actually "moving" things on the stack. –  user2485710 Jul 23 '13 at 9:52

1 Answer 1

In C or C++, I want to know stack frame size of a thread or process.

There is no such thing as the 'stack frame size of thread or process', in any language. The question is meaningless.

You are conflating two different things.

  1. The size of a stack frame depends on the calling convention in use, the target hardware, and the number and size of the local variables declared within the method.

  2. The size of a thread stack is determined by the operating system or compiler settings, not by the language itself.

  3. There is no such thing as the 'stack frame size of ... a process'. The expression is completely meaningless.

Could anybody tell me the number of stack frames for a thread or process?

Another meaningless question. The number of stack frames is dynamic, depending on the current call history.

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Likewise the question "[what is] the number of stack frames for a thread or process" is meaningless. –  Jesper Jul 23 '13 at 9:51
    
@Jesper Quite so. –  EJP Jul 23 '13 at 9:52
    
@sakthisundar I don't know why you consider an objective term like 'meaningless' to be impolite, but that's your subjective evaluation, not a fact. Most people would consider baselessly accusing me of lacking politeness to be in itself impolite. –  EJP Jul 23 '13 at 10:31

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