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I have this code to make it so that I can't add letters to the TextBox:

private void textBox1_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
{
    if (char.IsLetter(e.KeyChar))
    {
        e.Handled = true;
    }
}

private void textBox1_Leave(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    decimal x;
    decimal.TryParse(textBox1.Text, out x);
    textBox1.Text = x.ToString(".00");
}

I want to do three things depending on user entry:
"1.234" it knows that it is invalid.
"12" it will take it as "12.00".
"1.2" it will take it as "1.20".

Here is the skelton of my code:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
        public Form1()
        {    
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

        }    
}
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closed as unclear what you're asking by marc_s, dandan78, Schaliasos, zhangyangyu, Roman C Jul 23 '13 at 11:35

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
What is your question? Anyway see the MaskedTextBox. –  CodeCaster Jul 23 '13 at 10:29
4  
It's a really bad idea to use double for currency. Double is not precise. Try to use decimal. –  Simon Belanger Jul 23 '13 at 10:29
3  
@CodeCaster Or the NumericUpDown - I don't understand how unpopular it is, it solves so many of these problems and returns a number value rather than text. –  J... Jul 23 '13 at 10:30
2  
I'd use decimal, and if you are giving an output then you can use string.Format and use "C2" which formats it to a currency. –  Philip Gullick Jul 23 '13 at 10:31
3  
Depending on the culture, "1.234" could be a valid representation for "1,234.00" –  Corak Jul 23 '13 at 10:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is what you want:

private void textBox1_Leave(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
 decimal x;
 if(decimal.TryParse(textBox1.Text, out x)){
   if(textBox1.Text.IndexOf('.') != -1 && textBox1.Text.Split('.')[1].Length > 2){
      MessageBox.Show("The maximum decimal points are 2!");
      textBox1.Focus();
   }
   else textBox1.Text = x.ToString(".00");       
 }else {
   MessageBox.Show("Data invalid!");
   textBox1.Focus();
 }
}

Some ones suggested you that you should use decimal, however I understand that you allow user to input exact value only, so using double is OK. Many products have price of maximum 2 decimal points, so I think that's your case.

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1  
Please do not encourage the use of double for anything money related. Sooner or later this will lead to problems. double is great for many things, but for anything money related one should always use decimal. –  Corak Jul 23 '13 at 11:00

Okay so the comments give you useful answers, however if you are using a standard textbox/listbox/whatever you can simply format the string that you give.

Before I give you the code I would suggest getting into the habit of renaming your controls to things such as:

btnSubmit = button1
txtInputValue = textbox1

So to format the string you just do this:

YourOutputTextboxName.Text = string.format("{0:C2}", x.ToString())

Here we are formatting the string to show currency with two decimal places, given the value of x.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this! I have named them properly don't worry. –  liam.burns Jul 23 '13 at 10:54
1  
@liam.burns, no problem, this was you don't need to validate how many decimal places the end user inputs, meaning that you don't restrict them. If its bad input the tryparse will kick it out anyway, you may want to put the tryparse into an if statement though! :) –  Philip Gullick Jul 23 '13 at 10:56

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