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I need to create one array of numbers inside one range, like:

[1..5] in 10 times = [1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5]

[1..5] in 5 times = [1,2,3,4,5]

[1..5] in 3 times = [1,3,5]

def distribute(start_value, end_value, times, is_integer)
    array = Array.new(times-1)

    min_value = [end_value,start_value].min
    max_value = [end_value,start_value].max

    if max_value-min_value<times
      factor = (max_value-min_value).abs/(array.size).to_f
    else
      factor = (max_value-min_value).abs/(array.size-1).to_f
    end

    for i in 0..array.size
      v = [ [max_value, factor*(i+1)].min, min_value].max
      is_integer ? array[i] = v.round : array[i] = v
    end

    start_value < end_value ? array : array.reverse
  end

distribute(1, 5, 10, true) => [1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4] #WRONG should be [1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5]

distribute(5, 1, 5, true) => [5, 4, 3, 2, 1] #OK

distribute(1, 5, 3, true) => [4, 5, 5] #WRONG should be [1, 3, 5]

share|improve this question

How 'bout this:

def distribute(min,max,items)
  min,max = [min,max].sort
  (0...items).map {|i| (min + i * (max - min) / (items-1.0)).round}
end

Or if you really need the int/float flag:

def distribute(min,max,items,ints)
  min,max = [min,max].sort
  a = (0...items).map {|i| min + i * (max - min) / (items-1.0)}
  ints ? a.map {|i| i.round} : a
end

And if you really need this to go in reverse if the parameters are given to you backwards:

def distribute(min,max,items,ints)
  usemin,usemax = [min,max].sort
  diff = usemax - usemin
  a = (0...items).map {|i| usemin + i * diff / (items-1.0)}
  a.map! {|i| i.round} if ints
  min != usemin ? a.reverse : a
end
share|improve this answer
    
And obviously you can leave out the min,max= part if you know you're getting the parameters in the right order... – glenn mcdonald Nov 23 '09 at 4:15
    
Maybe I'm misunderstanding the problem, but this answer doesn't seem to work correctly for the OP's second use case: distribute(5, 1, 5, true) => [5, 4, 3, 2, 1]. – FMc Nov 23 '09 at 14:14
    
True. I just added another variation with that case. – glenn mcdonald Nov 23 '09 at 21:34
up vote 0 down vote accepted

just a little correction... when the array_size is 0

  def distribute(start_value, end_value, array_size, want_ints)
    diff = 1.0 * (end_value - start_value)
    n = [array_size-1, 1].max

    (0..(array_size-1)).map { |i|
        v = start_value + i * diff / n
        want_ints ? v.round : v
    }    
  end
share|improve this answer
1  
Rather than complicate the algorithm for the special case, you could short-circuit the method: return [] unless array_size > 0. At least for me, it's easier to understand the code that way. – FMc Nov 23 '09 at 14:08

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