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I have a class which, interface-wise, is as simple as this:

struct Foo
{
    inline Foo & operator << (int i)
    {
        return *this;
    }
};

I can then use it in the following way:

Foo foo;
foo << 1 << 2 << 3 << 4;

Now I would like to restrict the usage of this operator. For instance, I would like it to be called an even number of times between sequence points.

I currently address this problem using an internal proxy class. A temporary is created which, at the end of the control sequence, is destroyed and checks how many times the operator has been called:

struct Foo
{
    inline Foo() : m_count(0) {}

private:
    struct FooProxy
    {
        friend struct Foo;

        inline ~FooProxy();
        inline struct Foo & operator << (int i);

    private:
        inline FooProxy(struct Foo &foo) : m_foo(foo) {}
        struct Foo &m_foo;
    };

public:
    inline FooProxy operator << (int i);

private:
    int m_count;
};

inline Foo::FooProxy Foo::operator << (int i)
{
    ++m_count;
    return FooProxy(*this);
}

inline Foo & Foo::FooProxy::operator << (int i)
{
    ++m_foo.m_count;
    return m_foo;
}

inline Foo::FooProxy::~FooProxy()
{
    assert(m_foo.m_count % 2 == 0);
}

There are a few caveats but it mostly does the job:

Foo foo;
foo << 1 << 2 << 3 << 4; /* is OK */
foo << 1 << 2 << 3; /* triggers an assert */

Now I am wondering whether there is a way to enforce this at compile time, either using the same proxy technique, or using another strategy.

Another example of what I would like to achieve: enforce pushing at least one int after any number of float have been passed to the operator:

foo << 1 << 2 << 3.f << 4.f << 5; /* is OK */
foo << 1 << 2 << 3.f << 4.f; /* illegal because one `int` is needed */
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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jul 23 '13 at 11:07

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

    
Please provide the intended use-case, as it stands there's no reason why Sean's answer wouldn't work. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jul 23 '13 at 13:20
    
Are you willing to sacrifice the operator syntax for function call? –  jrok Jul 23 '13 at 13:56
    
Do you have to support C++03? If you can use C++11, then you should use variadic function templates. –  Derek Ledbetter Jul 23 '13 at 18:30
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use a template proxy that would encode the state as it's template parameter rather than member.

However unless you use the eventual return value for something, you can only check some conditions, but not others. For example you may check that an int was inserted before float or that no two floats are inserted in a row, but you can't check whether an int is inserted after any floats.

Generally you may detect any condition that must be satisfied before next insert by simply specializing the insertion operator to something invalid for the invalid states. But you can't check the final state, because all the proxies must be destructible (each is different, so all the intermediate ones will be destroyed).

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This is precisely what I am currently doing, and I was hoping there was a trick I might have overlooked. I am accepting this answer because in this specific case “you can’t do it” is more useful to me than “do it another way”. Thanks! –  Sam Hocevar Sep 23 '13 at 8:51
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Why not use something like a FooPair to enforce the even-ness:

struct FooPair
{
  int m_x, m_y;

  FooPair(int x, int) : m_x(x), m_y(y)
  {
  }
};

And:

inline Foo & operator << (const FooPair &pair)
{
  return *this;
}

so that people have to call it as:

Foo foo;
foo << FooPair(1,2) << FooPair(3,4);

It's more verbose, but will ensure that an even number of values are passed.

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2  
Why reinvent std::pair? –  nijansen Jul 23 '13 at 11:21
    
@Sean Because this is not the problem I want to solve. I will add other examples. –  Sam Hocevar Jul 23 '13 at 12:25
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