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Is there any regex master that can help me?

I have a list of words like {first|second|third}, and I want just the last word, in this case {first|second|third}.

Can anyone help me please??

Edit:

After feedback I am adding more information.

I have a sentence such as "I am going to France {today|tomorrow|next week}" for example. But I want only "I am going to France next week".

I tried (?<=\{).*?(?=\|.*?\}) but this gives me |tomorrow|next week, I just want next week without the vertical lines.

PS it doesn't necessarily have to 3 words, I just want the last regardless.

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closed as off-topic by Anirudha, soon, Kent, Jimbo, thegrinner Jul 23 '13 at 20:42

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1  
-1: This question does not show any research effort. What have you tried? –  John Bartholomew Jul 23 '13 at 11:21
    
use split function. –  Manish Sharma Jul 23 '13 at 11:22
2  
Read this and improve your question: John Skeets: Writing the perfect question and Matt Gemmells: What have you tried? –  stema Jul 23 '13 at 11:23
1  
I modified the question, is this good enough? –  happygilmore Jul 23 '13 at 11:36
    
@happygilmore - This question is better than your previous versions. –  JDB Jul 23 '13 at 17:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The regex you need is obviously:

((\w|\s)+)\}
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you're a genius, thank you. –  happygilmore Jul 23 '13 at 12:02
    
@happygilmore - [\s\w]+(?=\}) should give you the same result without needing to extract a group. –  JDB Jul 23 '13 at 17:10
    
@Cyborgx37 Sure. Still, I am advocating to come up with the simplest regex possible, and later refine it. For example, make the inner group non-capturing or replace by character class, as you advocate. Whether one wants a lookahead assertion if one can do without one is a matter of taste - I for my part avoid it unless it is absolutly needed. –  Ingo Jul 23 '13 at 18:24
    
@Ingo - I agree that it's essentially the same as your answer (which I upvoted) and that the differences are a matter of taste, not substance. Just providing a similar alternative. –  JDB Jul 23 '13 at 19:07

A python test of the regex:

>>> import re
>>> test = """ds like {first|second|third}, and I want just t"""
>>> re.findall('\|([^\|]+)\}', test)
['third']
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To generally replace {a|bc|def} with def with no nesting or other complications, search for the regex

\{[}]+\|([^|}]+)\}

and substitute with the first (and only) parenthesized subgroup. In Perl, that would be something like

s/\{[}]+\|([^|}]+)\}/$1/g;

Many other languages have a similar syntax, though it might be less compact. In PHP, look for preg_replace.

The expression looks complex, but isn't really; we look for a literal { followed by the longest possible string of characters which are not }, as long as it's followed by a literal | and (subgroup) a string of characters which are neither | nor }, and finally, after the subgroup, a literal }.

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Try this

/\{.+?([^|]+?)\}/

(you can easily test it by typing the following in your browser's JS console)

"{first|second|third}".replace( /\{.+?([^|]+?)\}/, "$1")

or even

"I am going on the {first|second|third}".replace(/\{.+?([^|]+?)\}/, "$1")
-> "I am going on the third"
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