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I have a long string which contains various combinations of \n, \r, \t and spaces in-between words and other characters.

  • I'd like to reduce all multiple spaces to a single space.
  • I want to reduce all \n, \r, \t combos to a single new-line character.
  • I want to reduce all \n, \r, \t and space combinations to a single new-line character as well.

I've tried ''.join(str.split()) in various ways to no success.

  • What is the correct Pythonic way here?

  • Would the solution be different for Python 3.x?

Ex. string:

ex_str = u'Word   \n \t \r   \n\n\n word2    word3   \r\r\r\r\nword4\n    word5'

Desired output [new new-line = \n]:

new_str = u'Word\nword2 word3\nword4\nword5'
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Don't name a variable str; it masks the built-in type. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 23 '13 at 11:39
    
"I want to reduce all \n, \r, \t and space combinations to a single new-line character as well." Do two spaces in a row count as a "\n, \r, \t and space combination"? If so, how do you decide when to use this rule, and when to use the first rule? –  Kevin Jul 23 '13 at 11:40
    
@Kevin, in-between words, I have anything from a single \n, single \t, single \r, single space to any (or same) of 1, 2, 3 or all 4 of them. If any combination has one or more new lines, I want it to be a single new line. If it has only spaces (one or more), I want it to be a single space. –  Phil Jul 23 '13 at 11:43
    
@MartijnPieters, I replaced the example string name. Thank you. –  Phil Jul 23 '13 at 11:45
    
You need to clarify your inclusion of \t in the newline rules there. Should word1\t\tword2 result in word1 word2 or word1\nword2? –  Martijn Pieters Jul 23 '13 at 11:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use a combination str.splitlines() and splitting on all whitespace with str.split():

'\n'.join([' '.join(line.split()) for line in ex_str.splitlines() if line.strip()])

This treats each line separately, removes empty lines, and then collapses all whitespace per line into single spaces.

Provided the input is a Python 3 string, the same solution works across both Python versions.

Demo:

>>> ex_str = u'Word   \n \t \r   \n\n\n word2    word3   \r\r\r\r\nword4\n    word5'
>>> '\n'.join([' '.join(line.split()) for line in ex_str.splitlines() if line.strip(' ')])
u'Word\nword2 word3\nword4\nword5'

To preserve tabs, you'd need to strip and split on just spaces and filter out empty strings:

'\n'.join([' '.join([s for s in line.split(' ') if s]) for line in ex_str.splitlines() if line.strip()])

Demo:

>>> '\n'.join([' '.join([s for s in line.split(' ') if s]) for line in ex_str.splitlines() if line.strip(' ')])
u'Word\n\t\nword2 word3\nword4\nword5'
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Very nice :) .. –  Haidro Jul 23 '13 at 11:40
    
This may not satisfy need 3 if it is \t\t . It should be replace by a newline. @Martijn Pieters –  zhangyangyu Jul 23 '13 at 11:46
    
@zhangyangyu: I am not 100% convinced that that is the case. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 23 '13 at 11:47
    
I think simple \ts shall be converted to newlines as well. The example string does not have that case, however. –  Alfe Jul 23 '13 at 12:04
    
@Alfe: See the comments on the question; the OP was confused about those. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 23 '13 at 12:05

Use simple regexps:

import re
new_str = re.sub(r'[^\S\n]+', ' ', re.sub(r'\s*[\n\t\r]\s*', '\n', ex_str))
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Use a regex:

>>> s
u'Word   \n \t \r   \n\n\n word2    word3   \r\r\r\r\nword4\t    word5'
>>> re.sub(r'[\n\r\t ]{2,}| {2,}', lambda x: '\n' if x.group().strip(' ') else ' ', s)
u'Word\nword2 word3\nword4\nword5'
>>> 
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Another solution using regex which replaces tabs with a space u'word1\t\tword2', or do you really want to add a line break here too?

import re
new_str = re.sub(r"[\n\ ]{2,}", "\n", re.sub(r"[\t\r\ ]+", " ", ex_str))
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'\n'.join(str.split())

Output:

u'Word\nword2\nword3\nword4\nword5'
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1  
Take a close look at the expected output ;) –  Haidro Jul 23 '13 at 11:43
    
You replaced the spacing between word2 and word3 with a newline. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 23 '13 at 11:43
    
Yeah. Just read that=[ –  Bartosz Meister Jul 23 '13 at 11:46

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