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When getting inherited from a parent class in PHP, especially in Codeigniter what does parent::__construct or parent::model() do?

How would it make difference if I don't __construct parent class? And, which way is suggested?

-Added-

The focus is more on Codeigniter specific regarding a call to parent::__construct in different ways depending on versions and also if this could be omitted in case Codeigniter would do this automatically.

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3  
learn about constructors. –  Nil'z Jul 23 '13 at 11:56
    
parent::__construct() SubClass constructor Doc –  Bora Jul 23 '13 at 11:57
2  
@SeongLee: What Niloy means is that, in PHP, if a child has a constructor, the parent constructor won't be called, unless you explicitly call it using parent::__construct();. in other words: the child masks the parent constructor method, so you need to specify the parent:: scope explicitly. So the answer to your question is: "That depends on what the parent constructor does, and if you need it" –  Elias Van Ootegem Jul 23 '13 at 12:01
2  
Specifically in CodeIgniter, If you don't call parent::__construct(); when the application controller is initializing, you'll lose Loader and Core class and $this->load would never works. check system/core/Controller.phplines: 37-54. –  Hashem Qolami Jul 23 '13 at 12:08
1  
@SeongLee Using parent::__construct(); is needed only if you want to declare __construct() method in your Controller which it will override the parent's one. That's true for models as well, but using parent::__construct(); in model just logs a debug message "Model Class Initialized", So if you need to know when Model is initialized (in logs), keep using that, If not, ignore it. –  Hashem Qolami Jul 24 '13 at 7:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 23 down vote accepted

This is a normal class constructor. Let's look at the following example:

class A {
    protected $some_var;

    function __construct() {
        $this->some_var = 'value added in class A';
    }

    function echo_some_var() {
        echo $this->some_var;
    }
}

class B extends A {
    function __construct() {
        $this->some_var = 'value added in class B';
    }
}

$a = new A;
$a->echo_some_var(); // will print out 'value added in class A'
$b = new B;
$b->echo_some_var(); // will print out 'value added in class B'

As you see, class B inherits all values and functions from A. So the class member $some_var is accessible from A as well as from B. Because we've added a constructor in class B, the constructor of class A will NOT be used when you are creating a new object of class B.

Now look at the following examples:

class C extends A {
    // empty
}
$c = new C;
$c->echo_some_var(); // will print out 'value added in class A'

As you can see, because we have not declared a constructor, the constructor of class A is used implicitly. But we can also do the following, which is equivalent to class C:

class D extends A {
    function __construct() {
        parent::__construct();
    }
}
$d = new D;
$d->echo_some_var(); // will print out 'value added in class A'

So you only have to use the line parent::__construct(); when you want a constructor in the child class to do something, AND execute the parent constructor. Example given:

class E extends A {
    private $some_other_var;

    function __construct() {
        // first do something important
        $this->some_other_var = 'some other value';

        // then execute the parent constructor anyway
        parent::__construct();
    }
}

More information can be found here: http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.php

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1  
@webber .. Sorry to reject your edit. It was indeed correct, so I've pushed it through. Good catch on the private bug –  arserbin3 May 20 '14 at 0:27

what does parent::__construct or parent::model() do?

these functions do exactly the same, only the construct function used to be named after the class itself prior to PHP5. I say in your example you are extending the Model class (and on some older version of CI since you don't need to use CI_model), if I'm correct in this __construct is the same as model().

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