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I'm designing an application that will create multiple Session objects, which can exist in a two states: 'active' and 'inactive'. Only a single Session object can be in the 'active' state at any one time and any one Session object can change between 'active' and 'inactive' any number of times during its lifetime. A Session object also has a DurationActive property of type TimeSpan that represents the total time that the Session was in the 'active' state.

Any suggestions on how I could implement this?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Daniel Cook, Renan, Will Eddins, Steven V, smerny Jul 23 '13 at 21:38

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
"solving this problem" What problem? –  Tim Schmelter Jul 23 '13 at 12:47
    
You know you're kind reinventing the wheel, right? –  Renan Jul 23 '13 at 12:56
    
Let's see what you got - at the moment it looks like a "please write this code for me" question –  BrokenGlass Jul 23 '13 at 12:57
    
@Renan No I don't - can you elaborate –  Dan Stevens Jul 23 '13 at 12:57
    
@BrokenGlass I do have one or two ideas of my own, which I'll post. –  Dan Stevens Jul 23 '13 at 12:58

4 Answers 4

To control the Active/inactive state of other session objects have a look into the Mediator Pattern

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mediator_pattern

This should allow you to keep the Session objects decoupled, and also abstract the interaction away from your main code

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The solution depends on whether you want Active to be achieved by setting a property, or by calling a method.

I'll only cover the latter option, as, in my opinion, it/s cleaner to code (and hence, maintain).

You will need A MakeActive() method (or similar), and a MakeInactive() method.

MakeActive() will:

  1. Check that all other Sessions are inactive (although this could - perhaps should - be handled at a higher level).
  2. Start a Stopwatch object, which would be a private member of the class. When the Stopwatch is instanciated will depend on what exactly you want to time: just the last activation, or the total activation in the Session's life.
  3. Make the Session active.

MakeInactive() will:

  1. Make the seeion inactive
  2. Stop the Stopwatch object.

Then implementing TimeActive is simply a case of getting the Stopwatch's Elapsed property, perhaps with guards so it is only valid when the session is Inactive.

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1  
+1 for Stopwatch. Although I don't think it's the Session object's job to ensure that all other Session objects are inactive. I would remove your step 1 in MakeActive. That's the job of the calling application. –  Jim Mischel Jul 23 '13 at 13:06
    
+1 for Stopwatch. –  Renan Jul 23 '13 at 14:33

Have a static DateTime property LastChange. In property State (or in function SetActive, or whatever) add to DurationActive the difference between DateTime.Now and LastChange. Also update LastChange to DateTime.Now.

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1  
DateTime.Now - startTime breaks down when DST changes. It's not designed for measuring durations. System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch is a better alternative. –  RoadieRich Jul 23 '13 at 13:05
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to Chris' suggestion for using the Mediator pattern, I've come with what I believe is a better solution.

In order to control access, the following classes would exist inside their own Assembly:

namespace Sessions
{

    public interface ISession
    {
        bool IsActive { get; }
        TimeSpan DurationActive { get; }
    }

    internal class Session : ISession
    {
        private Stopwatch _stopwatch;
        private bool _isChargeable;

        public bool IsActive
        {
            get { return _stopwatch.IsRunning; }
        }

        public TimeSpan DurationActive
        {
            get { return _stopwatch.Elapsed;  }
        }

        internal Session()
        {
            _stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        }

        internal void Activate()   
        {
            _stopwatch.Start();
        }

        internal void Deactivate()
        {
            _stopwatch.Stop();
        }
    }

    public sealed class SessionMediator
    {

        private static readonly SessionMediator _instance = new SessionMediator();

        public static ISession CreateSession()
        {
            return _instance.createSession();
        }

        public static void ActivateSession(ISession session)
        {
            _instance.activateSession((Session)session);
        }

        private Session _currentSession = null;

        private SessionMediator() { }

        private ISession createSession()
        {
            return new Session();
        }

        private void activateSession(Session session)
        {
            // Deactivate the current session
            if (_currentSession != null)
                _currentSession.Deactivate();

            // Make the given session the current session
            _currentSession = session;

            // Activate the new current session
            if (_currentSession != null)
                _currentSession.Activate();
        }

    }

}

And my test program, in a separate Assembly:

namespace TestSessionProgram
{
    public class Program
    {
        public void Main()
        {
            ISession session1 = SessionMediator.CreateSession();
            ISession session2 = SessionMediator.CreateSession();
            ISession session3 = SessionMediator.CreateSession();

            SessionMediator.ActiveSession(session1)
            Thread.Sleep(2000);
            Debug.Assert(session1.DurationActive == TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2));

            SessionMediator.ActiveSession(session2)
            Thread.Sleep(3000);
            Debug.Assert(session2.DurationActive == TimeSpan.FromSeconds(3));

            SessionMediator.ActiveSession(session1)
            Thread.Sleep(3000);
            Debug.Assert(session1.DurationActive == TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
        }
    }
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The effect you are implementing with a Timer already exists within the .Net framework as System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch. See my answer above. –  RoadieRich Jul 23 '13 at 13:26

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