Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This is my example code:

int main()
{
    const wchar_t *envpath = L"hello\\";
    const wchar_t *dir = L"hello2\\";
    const wchar_t *core = L"hello3";

    wchar_t *corepath = new wchar_t[
        wcslen(envpath) +
        wcslen(dir) +
        wcslen(core)
    ];

    wcscpy_s(corepath, wcslen(corepath) + wcslen(envpath) + 1, envpath);
    wcscat_s(corepath, wcslen(corepath) + wcslen(dir) + 1, dir);
    wcscat_s(corepath, wcslen(corepath) + wcslen(core) + 1, core);

    delete []corepath;
    return 0;
}

On the delete []corepath command, a breakpoint is triggered.
What could be the cause?

ALSO, If I rewrite the code this way:

    wcscpy_s(corepath, wcslen(envpath) + 1, envpath);
    wcscat_s(corepath, wcslen(corepath) + wcslen(dir) + 1, dir);
    wcscat_s(corepath, wcslen(corepath) + wcslen(core) + 1, core);

A Heap corruption is detected when deleting the pointer.

EDIT:

I think I should allocate corepath also with +1 to store the ending \0, right?

share|improve this question
1  
"I think I should allocate corepath also with +1 to store the ending \0, right?" Yes. Better still, use std::wstring to handle all the memory allocation correctly for you. – Mike Seymour Jul 23 '13 at 13:13
1  
wcslen returns the length of the string, without the NULL termination character, so when you allocate corepath, you should account for the NULL termination character. – TheDarkKnight Jul 23 '13 at 13:14
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're not allocating enough space to contain the terminating zero. The last call to wcscat_s will write '\0' beyond the end of the buffer pointed to by corepath.

You're also lying to wcscat_s about the capacity of the buffer. The capacity is wcslen(envpath) + wcslen(dir) + wcslen(core), yet you're passing wcslen(corepath) + wcslen(core) + 1 instead.

You're also calling wcslen(corepath) before corepath is initialized.

The fixed code should look like this:

int main()
{
    const wchar_t *envpath = L"hello\\";
    const wchar_t *dir = L"hello2\\";
    const wchar_t *core = L"hello3";

    size_t cap = wcslen(envpath) +
        wcslen(dir) +
        wcslen(core) + 1;

    wchar_t *corepath = new wchar_t[cap];

    wcscpy_s(corepath, cap, envpath);
    wcscat_s(corepath, cap, dir);
    wcscat_s(corepath, cap, core);

    delete[] corepath;
    return 0;
}

Actually, the fixed code should look like this:

#include <string>
int main()
{
    const wchar_t *envpath = L"hello\\";
    const wchar_t *dir = L"hello2\\";
    const wchar_t *core = L"hello3";

    std::wstring corepath = envpath;
    corepath.append(dir);
    corepath.append(core);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the final version. – Sebastian Redl Jul 23 '13 at 13:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.