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I am trying to find a way to exclude numbers on a file when I cat ti but I only want to exclude the numbers on print $1 and I want to keep the number that is in front of the word. I have something that I thought might might work but is not quite giving me what I want. I have also showed an example of what the file looks like.The file is separated by pipes.

cat files  | awk -F '|' ' {print $1 "\t" $2}' |sed 's/0123456789//g'

input:

b1ark45 | dog23 | brown
m2eow66| cat24 |yellow
h3iss67 | snake57 | green

Output

 b1ark dog23    
 m2eow cat24    
 h3iss nake57
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Lose the cat (google UUOC). awk can open files just fine. – Ed Morton Jul 23 '13 at 20:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

try this:

awk -F'|' -v OFS='|' '{gsub(/[0-9]/,"",$1)}7'  file

the output of your example would be:

bark | dog23 | brown    
meow| cat24 |yellow    
hiss | snake57 | green

EDIT

this outputs col1 (without ending numbers and spaces) and col2, separated by <tab>

kent$  echo "b1ark45 | dog23 | brown
m2eow66| cat24 |yellow
h3iss67 | snake57 | green"|awk -F'|' -v OFS='\t' '{gsub(/[0-9]*\s*$/,"",$1);print $1,$2}'
b1ark    dog23 
m2eow    cat24 
h3iss    snake57
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That does work but I need to keep the the number that is in front of the word. I only want to exclude the numbers on print $1 and I want to keep the number that is in front of the word. Sorry should have stated that from the start – user2607210 Jul 23 '13 at 13:52
    
Try this awk -F'|' -v OFS='|' '{sub(/[0-9 ]+$/,"",$1)}1' file – jaypal singh Jul 23 '13 at 13:55
    
@user2607210 does jaypal's solution work for you? do you want to keep the ending space too? please add an output example for your input. so that we could see what do you really expect to have. – Kent Jul 23 '13 at 13:58
    
I have added an output for what I am looking for. – user2607210 Jul 23 '13 at 14:11
    
Jaypal's solution almost works but i do not need the the third field and iti s giving me the third field. – user2607210 Jul 23 '13 at 14:14

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 's/[0-9]*\s*\|\s*(\S*).*/ \1/' file
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