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I have two lists : List(1,1,1) , List(1,0,1)

I want to get the following :

  1. A count of every element that contains a 1 in first list and a 0 in the corresponding list at same position and vice versa. In above example this would be 1 , 0 since the first list contains a 1 at middle position and second list contains a 0 at same position (middle).

  2. A count of every element where 1 is in first list and 1 is also in second list. In above example this is two since there are two 1's in each corresponding list. I can get this using the intersect method of class List.

I am just looking an answer to point 1 above. I could use an iterative a approach to count the items but is there a more functional method ? Here is the entire code :

class Similarity {

  def getSimilarity(number1 : List[Int] , number2 : List[Int]) = {

    val num : List[Int] =  number1.intersect(number2)
    println("P is "+num.length)  


  }

}

   object HelloWorld {
    def main(args: Array[String]) {

      val s = new Similarity
      s.getSimilarity(List(1,1,1) , List(1,0,1))

    }
  }
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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

For the first one:

scala> val a = List(1,1,1)
a: List[Int] = List(1, 1, 1)

scala> val b = List(1,0,1)
b: List[Int] = List(1, 0, 1)

scala> a.zip(b).filter(x => x._1==1 && x._2==0).size
res7: Int = 1

For the second:

scala> a.zip(b).filter(x => x._1==1 && x._2==1).size
res7: Int = 2
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1  
Couldn't you just say x => x._1==1 && x._2==0 ? –  Victor Moroz Jul 23 '13 at 14:18
5  
Actually you can replace filter(predicate).size with just count(predicate) –  om-nom-nom Jul 23 '13 at 16:21

You can count all combinations easily and have it in a map with

def getSimilarity(number1 : List[Int] , number2 : List[Int]) = {

  //sorry for the 1-liner, explanation follows 
  val countMap = (number1 zip number2) groupBy (identity) mapValues {_.length}

}

/*
 * Example
 * number1 = List(1,1,0,1,0,0,1)
 * number2 = List(0,1,1,1,0,1,1)
 * 
 * countMap = Map((1,0) -> 1, (1,1) -> 3, (0,1) -> 2, (0,0) -> 1)
 */

The trick is a common one

// zip the elements pairwise

(number1 zip number2) 

/* List((1,0), (1,1), (0,1), (1,1), (0,0), (0,1), (1,1))
 *
 * then group together with the identity function, so pairs
 * with the same elements are grouped together and the key is the pair itself
 */ 

.groupBy(identity) 

/* Map( (1,0) -> List((1,0)), 
 *      (1,1) -> List((1,1), (1,1), (1,1)), 
 *      (0,1) -> List((0,1), (0,1)), 
 *      (0,0) -> List((0,0))
 * )
 *
 * finally you count the pairs mapping the values to the length of each list
 */

.mapValues(_.length)

/* Map( (1,0) -> 1, 
 *      (1,1) -> 3, 
 *      (0,1) -> 2, 
 *      (0,0) -> 1
 * )

Then all you need to do is lookup on the map

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a.zip(b).filter(x => x._1 != x._2).size
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Almost the same solution thant the one proposed by Jatin, except that you can useList.countfor a better lisibility:

def getSimilarity(l1: List[Int], l2: List[Int]) =
  l1.zip(l2).count({case (x,y) => x != y})
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2  
Why not just l1.zip(l2).count{case (x,y) => x != y} –  Luigi Plinge Jul 23 '13 at 14:45
    
Because I didn't thought to use count when I wrote it first. I'm updating the answer. ;) –  Nicolas Jul 24 '13 at 6:19

You can also use foldLeft. Assuming there are no non-negative numbers:

a.zip(b).foldLeft(0)( (x,y) => if (y._1 + y._2 == 1) x + 1 else x )
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1) You could zip 2 lists to get list of (Int, Int), collect only pairs (1, 0) and (0, 1), replace (1, 0) with 1 and (0, 1) with -1 and get sum. If count of (1, 0) and count of (0, 1) are the same the sum would be equal 0:

val (l1, l2) = (List(1,1,1) , List(1,0,1))

(l1 zip l2).collect{
  case (1, 0) => 1
  case (0, 1) => -1
}.sum == 0

You could use view method to prevent creation intermediate collections.

2) You could use filter and length to get count of elements with some condition:

(l1 zip l2).filter{ _ == (1, 1) }.length
(l1 zip l2).collect{ case (1, 1) => () }.length
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