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I have a list of values, say

13, 21, 33
24, 43, 80 and so on. 

I am trying to read each line individually, and then take the log of each line So for ex.

logy = log10(13, 21, 33)

In a loop, going through each line individually.

I then use the log values as an y value to a power law fit. Then I get the index for the fit of each line.

I am however unable to do read the lines and take their log individually with a loop. Any suggestions as to how I can do this? The number of lines I have is small.

So far I have-

from numpy import log10
from scipy import optimize
from math import sqrt

x = [3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0]
y809   =1.390275E-12,6.859800000000001E-13,3.901267241379311E-13,1.55844E-13
yy816   =2.4975E-12,1.2187800000000002E-12,6.510724137931035E-13,2.55119625E-13
logx = log10(x)


logy = log10(y809)
logyerr = 0.05

fitfunc = lambda p, x: p[0] + p[1] * x
errfunc = lambda p, x, y, err: (y - fitfunc(p, x)) / err

pinit = [1.0, -1.0]
out = optimize.leastsq(errfunc, pinit,
                       args=(logx, logy, logyerr), full_output=1)

pfinal = out[0]
covar = out[1]
print pfinal
print covar

index = pfinal[1]
amp = 10.0**pfinal[0]

indexErr = sqrt( covar[0][0] )
ampErr = sqrt( covar[1][1] ) * amp

As you can see I haven't figured out how to read and take the log of each line.

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could you please show us your code? –  nio Jul 23 '13 at 14:32
    
I don't understand how you can have more than 1 argument to log10 ? –  Frodon Jul 23 '13 at 15:04
    
firstly, sorry, I didn't paste the whole copy of my code, I have done now-x = [3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0] y809 =13, 14, 15, 20 and so on y values logx = log10(x) logy = log10(y809) logyerr = 0.05 fitfunc = lambda p, x: p[0] + p[1] * x errfunc = lambda p, x, y, err: (y - fitfunc(p, x)) / err pinit = [1.0, -1.0] out = optimize.leastsq(errfunc, pinit, args=(logx, logy, logyerr), full_output=1) pfinal = out[0] covar = out[1] print pfinal print covar index = pfinal[1] amp = 10.0**pfinal[0] indexErr = sqrt( covar[0][0] ) ampErr = sqrt( covar[1][1] ) * amp –  user2398849 Jul 23 '13 at 15:14
    
I think formatting this in your question would be way more readable, thanks! –  jh314 Jul 23 '13 at 15:15
    
Hi Frodon, I assume the value of each argument is taken the log of separately. For example, I tried y = 10,1,0, and logy = log10(y) I get the right answer i.e. 1, 0, inf. –  user2398849 Jul 23 '13 at 15:18

2 Answers 2

You can try this:

with open('data.txt','r') as f:                     #<-- open file
    next(f)                                         #<-- skip header
    for line in f:                                  #<-- read line by line
        args = [float(x) for x in line.split(' ')]  #<-- parse line into list
        print log10(args)                           #<-- run log10 on list
share|improve this answer
    
This gives the following exception: TypeError: a float is required (edit: I suppose log10 comes from the math module) –  Frodon Jul 23 '13 at 15:06
    
I'm not sure either. numpy has a log10 which takes in an iterable. –  jh314 Jul 23 '13 at 15:09
    
Hi jh314, I think I'm making a mistake in reading in the line as a string as I get the following error-invalid literal for int() with base 10:''2.78055E-12 1.68498E-12 9.456051724137932E-13 5.3946E-13 \n' I've never read data using text files before so Im unsure? –  user2398849 Jul 23 '13 at 15:23
    
What does the first 2 lines of your file look like? –  jh314 Jul 23 '13 at 15:25
    
Replace int() by float() ? –  Frodon Jul 23 '13 at 15:28

Assuming data is in comma delimited file, data.txt

import numpy as np
a=np.genfromtxt('data.txt',delimiter=',')
[np.log10(x) for x in [a[y,:] for y in range(len(a))]]

gives the log of each value, with a separate array for each line:

[array([ 1.11394335,  1.32221929,  1.51851394]), array([ 1.38021124,  1.63346846,  1.90308999])]
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