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In a C++ program, for a class, how can we get the counts of the number of active objects at any point of time which are statically created and dynamically created separately??

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Sadly you just can't. There's a whole section in one of the books by Scott Meyer's where he goes on about the challenges of trying to achieve this and the short of it is it's not possible.

More Effective C++ - Item #27: Requiring or prohibiting heap-based objects.

Ok here's one of the problems that is easily demonstrated (the item in question is several pages long so I won't summarize all of it but here's at least one challenge):

Many (but not all) systems arrange their memory in the following fashion:

----------------
|     Stack    |
| (Grows Down) |
|              |
----------------
|              |
|              |
|              |
|              |
|              |
|              |
----------------
|     Heap     |
|  (Grows Up)  |
|              |
----------------

Now you might think with a memory arrangement like this you could do something clever with operator new/new operator to figure out if you're on the heap or not right (by checking if you're above or below a certain memory location)? Here's the problem. Where static objects go is system dependent, so the following thing could happen:

----------------
|     Stack    |
| (Grows Down) |
|              |
----------------
|              |
|              |
|              |
|              |
|              |
|              |
----------------
|     Heap     |
|  (Grows Up)  |
|              |
----------------
|    Static    | 
|    Objects   |
----------------

You now fail to distinguish between static objects and heap object. Oops! Also you may have noticed I said this is system dependent, which means even if you were to figure out a way to distinguish between them, well your code would not be portable.

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2  
Can you tell a bit more about the difficulties ? – hivert Jul 23 '13 at 15:14
    
I'm looking those up now. I don't know them by heart. – Borgleader Jul 23 '13 at 15:16
4  
@hivert: The basic difficulty is that the language gives you no way to tell how an object was allocated. You could track dynamic objects with smart pointers or overloaded operator new/delete; but there's no way to distinguish between static, automatic, thread-local and temporary objects. – Mike Seymour Jul 23 '13 at 15:16

Caveat: This uses "unedfined behaviour", as described below - it is known to work on MOST platforms (I have enough understanding to say this works on ARM and x86 in Windows, Linux and Symbian OS's, and should be fine for most OS's that use a "flat" memory model).

If you "limit" yourself to a particular system, it could be possible to compare this to a known range of "where the stack is" (and if need be) where static data is). [It would be possible to figure out where the stack is for an arbitrary thread too, but it makes the challenge a little harder].

With the knowledge of where static data, and stack is located, we can compare

char *this_addr = static_cast<char*>(this);
if (this_addr >= globa_start && this_addr <= global_end) 
   globals++;
else if (this_addr >= stacK_top && this_addr >= stack_base)
   stacked++;
else heaped++; 

Note that this will only work if you can actually somehow figure out where the stack is - and of course, it's undefined behaviour to compare this with anything outside the block it was allocated in, so technically, the whole concept is undefined. However, it's POSSIBLE to do this in most OS/Processor architectures. [Of course, you also need to do the same but in reverse in the destructor]. (It also gets "fun" if you destroy the object from a different thread than the one that created it!)

Edit: Finding the stack for a given thread isn't that hard: Store [per thread if there are more than one thread] the address of a local variable in the "first function" (the one passed into the thread create call). Then take the address of a variable in the current thread. Anything between those values is in that threads stack, as the stack is one contiguous lump of memory.

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Out of curiosity, would that work for 64 bit (won't casting to char be a problem)? – Ilya Kobelevskiy Jul 23 '13 at 15:56
    
It was meant to be char * - now corrected. – Mats Petersson Jul 23 '13 at 15:58

As an option, you can globally overload new and delete to increment/decrement some static counter, that would give global count of dynamically allocated objects...

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The whole difficulty is in distinguishing static from dynamic allocations. Please explain how one would do that. – Borgleader Jul 23 '13 at 15:37
    
Yes, I have no answer for that yet... Just wanted to mention possibility of overload to illustrate how count (and size of each object with proper overload) can be retrieved, this should also be system independent. – Ilya Kobelevskiy Jul 23 '13 at 15:50
    
@Borgleader Nowhere in the question is there any hint that this would not be an acceptable solution. Also, as others have pointed out, there is no way to do this without triggering undefined behavior. Moreover, I believe this is the only right solution to do it, unless you are trying to solve a memory leak or something, in which case you should be using the proper tools like valgrind instead. Please see my answer for a more detailed solution. – Fozi Jul 23 '13 at 16:22
    
@Fozi Making the distinction is part of the question, I was simply stating that this detail was glossed over and since it's not trivial it's somewhat of a big omission. – Borgleader Jul 23 '13 at 16:27
    
@Borgleader I don't see that it's part of the question. But even if it was, the answer would be: "You can't. But hey, you can do this. Or use valgrind." – Fozi Jul 23 '13 at 16:32

The easiest solution to track the number of active objects is to create an object manager (with a GetSize() function or whatever)

In the class you want to trace, you can also add a static property which will be increased and decreased in constructors and destructors respectively.

With the size of the object manager (dynamic allocation) and the static property (all allocations) you will be able to retrieve those numbers separately.

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OP wants to distinguish between dynamically allocated objects and statically allocated ones. – Borgleader Jul 23 '13 at 15:27
    
With the number of dynamic allocations and all allocations, you can compute the number of static allocations easily. Of course that's not a nice system, but that's the easiest I can think of at the moment :) – Rak Jul 23 '13 at 15:30

You could simply tell the class by passing an argument about its location:

class LocationAware {
public:
    enum Location { STATIC, STACK, HEAP };
    explicit LocationAware(Location location) : my_location(location) {
        switch(location) {
            case STATIC: ++static_instaces; break;
            case STACK: ++stack_instances; break;
            case HEAP: ++heap_instances; break;
        }
    }

    ~LocationAware() {
        switch(my_location) {
            case STATIC: --static_instaces; break;
            case STACK: --stack_instances; break;
            case HEAP: --heap_instances; break;
        }
    }

private:
    const Location my_location;

public:
    static unsigned static_instaces;
    static unsigned heap_instances;
    static unsigned stack_instances;
};

unsigned LocationAware::static_instaces = 0;
unsigned LocationAware::heap_instances = 0;
unsigned LocationAware::stack_instances = 0;

LocationAware stat(LocationAware::STATIC);

int main() {
    LocationAware stack(LocationAware::STACK);

    LocationAware * heap = new LocationAware(LocationAware::HEAP);
}

Of course you can lie to this class. Don't.

Also, if you would like to make it less intrusive you could make it a template and use inheritance or encapsulation and use it from your class. Just give it a parameter:

template<class Tag>
LocationAware;

Then either inherit or hold a location in your class and initialize it. You can see the instances using LocationAware<YourClassOrTag>::xy_instances.

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