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I have a problem using switch statement when I tried to deal with a special situation. For example, I have 3 cases: A, B, C.

  • for A, I want to do statement_1 and statement_3.
  • for B, I want to do statement_2 and statement_3.
  • for C, I want to do nothing

if I use if-else statement, it will look like the following:

 if ( not C){
    do statement_3

   if B
      do statement 2
   else if A
      do statement 1

 }

If I want to use switch statement to do the same thing, I have some trouble.

switch (variable){
case A:  do statement_1
case B: do statement_2
// how to do statement 3 here?  
}

I am trying to avoid the duplicated codes. So I am thinking that how to make the codes as simple as I can.

UPDATE 1:

  1. to make my codes/question more clear, I just want to make my codes as simple/clear as I can, that is why I want to use switch statement instead of if-else. Also, I heard that switch-statement is usually faster than if-else. (I am not 100% sure though).

  2. I want to use switch-case because Case A, B, C are enum type. they are not variable. Sorry about the confusion.

  3. each statements are more than 10 lines of codes. That is why I do not want to do the followings:

    switch (enum variable) {
    case A:
      statement1
      statement3
     break;
    case B:
      statement2
      statement3
     break;
    

    }

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This code won't work, because Java 6 and older expects a value of a primitive type. Java 7 can dealt that with Strings. –  reporter Jul 23 '13 at 15:48
1  
switch is no good - you can't skip over cases, which is what you'd have to do to avoid coding the call to statement_3 twice –  Bohemian Jul 23 '13 at 15:49
8  
what's wrong with if? If a switch is not the right tool, don't use it. Most of the time, it's not the right tool. –  JB Nizet Jul 23 '13 at 15:49
    
I think the if is fine too... –  Bohemian Jul 23 '13 at 15:51
1  
Or Replace Conditional with Polymorphism and get rid of the if / switch –  zapl Jul 23 '13 at 15:54
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5 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

i would recommend to define exactly what staments should be executed:

switch (variable){
    case A: 
        statement_1();
        statement_3();
        break;
    case B: 
        statement_2();
        statement_3();
        break;
}

for Update-3:

create methods for those 10 lines:

public void statement_1() {
    //your 10 lines of code
}

if you're always executing statement_3, except for case C you can go with if/else-blocks as you wrote them.

but in my honest opinion: define EXACTLY what has to be done in which case if you have a small amount of cases. it is easier to read for others

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1  
+1. While I am a huge proponent of DRY, one extra line of code for absolute clarity is a win. –  user949300 Jul 23 '13 at 16:19
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You can do this:

switch (variable){
  case A:  do statement_1; do statement_3; break;
  case B:  do statement_2; do statement_3; break;    
}
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Why not nest the switch into the if statement? there is no-repeat code this way.

if(!C){
    statement_3;
    switch(variable){
    case A:
        statement_1;
        break;
    case B: 
        statement_2;
        break;
}

or make use of both the if-statement and the switch?

if(!C){
    statement_3;
}
switch(variable){
case A:
    statement_1;
    break;
case B: 
    statement_2;
    break;
share|improve this answer
    
but why use a switch with 2 cases and mix it all up? you don't gain performance or anything. it might be confusing for other developers –  Philipp Sander Jul 23 '13 at 16:14
    
Because the question referred to using a switch statement. If it is only 2 or 3 cases, then the if-elseif-else is the way to go. but if there is a grouping of statements that all share the same code, say a couple dozen times but not under one scenario, why repeat the code when you can have it executed before the switch (as long as a certain condition is not met)? –  ArtyMcFly Jul 23 '13 at 16:20
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I often find introducing enums adds clarity. Here I imagine each enum is an issue which can be resolved through a number of processes:

enum Issue {
  A {
    void handleIt () {
      statement_1();
      statement_3();
    }
  },
  B {
    void handleIt () {
      statement_2();
      statement_3();
    }
  },
  C {
    void handleIt () {
      // Do nothing.
    }
  },
  D {
    void handleIt () {
      A.handleIt();
      B.handleIt();
    }
  };

  abstract void handleIt();
}

Note here that you get the added benefit of being able to handle certain issues using the solutions of other issues (see my D enum).

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If a case has more than 2-3 statements it's bette(from point of view of readability and clean code) to extract them as separate methods:

switch (variable){
    case A: handleCaseA(); break;
    case B: handleCaseB(); break;
    default: handleDefaultCase(); break;
}
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