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I have had issues in the past with mySQL injection attacks so I have written a new login script using PDO prepared statements. I would be most grateful if someone can cast their eye over it and let me know if it is secure enough to use on my sites.

Code is as follows:

if(isset($_POST['login'])&& !empty($_POST['username']) && !empty($_POST['password']))
{

$username=$_POST['username'];
$password=sha1($_POST['password']);

$sql = "SELECT * FROM admin WHERE username ='".$username."' AND password = '".$password."'";

$result = $PDOdbh->query($sql)->fetchAll();

$check = count($result);

if($check > '0') {  
$_SESSION['loggedin'] = "1";
$_SESSION['username'] = "".$username."";
header("Location: index.php");
}

else {
$_SESSION['loggedin'] = "0";
$_SESSION['username'] = "";
header ("Location: login.php?error");
}

}

if(isset($_POST['login'])&& empty($_POST['username']) && empty($_POST['password']))
{
header ("Location: login.php?missing");
}

On my index.php page within the admin I have a call to the following function:

function checkloggedin() {
if($_SESSION['loggedin'] == "0" || $_SESSION['loggedin'] !== "1" || $_SESSION['username'] == "") {
header("Location: login.php");
exit;
}
}
share|improve this question
5  
"PDO prepared statement" Where is this PDO prepared statement you speak of? –  NullUserException Jul 23 '13 at 15:55
1  
No, it's not secure; you're adding $_POST['username'] into your query, without escaping it. That's a huge SQL injection vulnerability. If you're using PDO, why aren't you using a prepared statement and bound parameters? –  andrewsi Jul 23 '13 at 15:55
1  
Looks like someone could do sql injection with their username –  StephenTG Jul 23 '13 at 15:55
1  
Also looks like you should salt your password hashes. –  eggyal Jul 23 '13 at 15:56
5  
It's, quite frankly, a load of crap. It's not secure, shows evidence of cargo-cult programming, and WILL produce a large quantity of warnings for unset varaibles. –  Marc B Jul 23 '13 at 15:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To answer your question, dude, your code is still vulnerable to SQL Injection. It is not even using a prepared statement. (It's not clear that you understand what a prepared statement is.)

So, here's an example of a prepared statement:

$stmt = $PDOdbh->prepare("SELECT 1 FROM admin WHERE username = :p1 AND password = :p2");
$stmt->bindParam(':p1', $username);
$stmt->bindParam(':p2', $password);
if ($stmt->execute() ) {
   while ($row = $stmt->fetch()) {
      // we got a row back
   }
}

Notice the "prepare" method and the "bindParam" method. We refer to $stmt as a "prepared statement". (That may have something to do with the fact that it's the return from a call to a method named "prepare", but who really knows?)

(Obviously, this is just an example, the actual return from prepare should be checked to verify that the method succeeded, and didn't throw an error.)

Given your new attempt, you don't even seem to understand what a SQL Injection vulnerability actually is, how to identify it.

To illustrate how SQL Injection works, let's take a very simple example, and consider these values:

$user = "a' OR 1=1 -- ";
$pass = "doodah";
$sql = "SELECT * FROM admin WHERE username = '".$user."' AND password = '".$pass."'";

the contents of $sql evaluates to

SELECT * FROM admin WHERE username ='a' OR 1=1 -- ' AND password = 'doodah'

When that gets sent to the database, everything following the -- will be seen as a comment, so this is really equivalent to:

SELECT * FROM admin WHERE username ='a' OR 1=1

When that statement is executed, if there is at least one row in the admin table (and the admin table exists, and we have select privilege on the table, and the username column exists in the table, etc.) then that statement will return at least one row.


Further, consider an even more familiar example:

$username = "Robert'; DROP TABLE students; -- ";

"Little Bobby Tables we call him" http://xkcd.com/327/:


Using a prepared statement is one way to mitigate this type of SQL Injection vulnerability.

From the prepared statement (in the the sample at the top of the question), the SQL text sent to the database(*) is:

SELECT 1 FROM admin WHERE username = :p1 AND password = :p2

That's a constant string. And the values supplied for :p1 and :p2 (when the statement is executed) can ONLY be interpreted as values. It's not possible for the contents of those values to be evaluated as SQL syntax, such as keywords, identifiers or delimiters. (This is true in the context of this prepared SQL statement only. In the case of other statements, like an INSERT, the values assigned to the columns could be accessed by a TRIGGER, and it's possible that someone has created a vulnerability within the trigger.)

(*) In the case of MySQL, that's not exactly true; the server doesn't actually accept prepared statements, the same way that other databases do. With MySQL, the client library handles the prepared statement, and does safe (properly escaped) substitution of the bind placeholders.

share|improve this answer
    
This is extremely useful! Thank you very much. –  Pete Naylor Jul 24 '13 at 8:15
    
@Pete Naylor: I'm glad that was of some use to you. This should give you a way of looking at code that generates SQL, and evaluating whether it is vulnerable to SQL Injection. It's not just the $_POST[] variables that are vulnerable, these just happen to be easy targets from a web page. Be aware that Little Bobby Tables could be lurking in a datastore other that $_POST variables. –  spencer7593 Jul 24 '13 at 16:08

Thanks for your comments (Well some of them)

I have modified my code, see below. Do I still need to add the mysql_real_escape_string to the $_POST values? Thank you!

if(isset($_POST['login'])&& !empty($_POST['username']) && !empty($_POST['password']))
{

$username=$_POST['username'];
$password=sha1($_POST['password']);

$stmt = $PDOdbh->prepare("SELECT * FROM admin WHERE username = :p1 AND password = :p2");
$stmt->bindParam(':p1', $username);
$stmt->bindParam(':p2', $password);
if ($stmt->execute() ) {
$row = $stmt->fetch();
  if($row) { //  Entry found in DB
      $_SESSION['loggedin'] = "1";
      $_SESSION['username'] = "".$username."";
      header("Location: index.php");
  }
  else { //  Entry not found in DB
       $_SESSION['loggedin'] = "0";
       $_SESSION['username'] = "";
       header ("Location: login.php?error");
  }
}
}

if(isset($_POST['login'])&& empty($_POST['username']) && empty($_POST['password']))
{
header ("Location: login.php?missing");
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The SELECT statement in this code is a prepared statement. This is not vulnerable to SQL Injection. –  spencer7593 Jul 24 '13 at 13:41
    
Thank you for your help, I really appreciate it. –  Pete Naylor Jul 24 '13 at 14:26
1  
Do you still need to wrap $_POST[] variables in calls to mysql_real_escape_string? No. Since you are using PDO and prepared statements, you do not need (or want) to use mysql_real_escape_string. That function was part of the old mysql_ interface, which is deprecated and replaced with your choice of two different interaces: mysqli and PDO. The mysql_real_escape_string function was the function we called that made values "safe" (in terms of SQL Injection) to be included as part of the SQL text. –  spencer7593 Jul 24 '13 at 15:40

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