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Is it possible to somehow mark certain enum values in Java as package-private, i.e. give them the default modifier?

Background (only to preempt the otherwise immediate first comment "What for?" ;) )

I have a Task-object with different execution-methods and an execution-state that decides which method to call next. Each one of the execution-methods returns the execution-state of the next method to be called (basically a framework for executing a state-machine).

I have an enum that contains all possible execution-states, but also contains a few "package-internal" states like "pending" or "failed" that should not be returnable by the execution-methods.

I know I could manage these states in a separate variable with its own enum, but that would make the code a lot less clean as it turns a single switch-statement into (at least) two (and possibly a surrounding if). Also, I could, of course, just check the return value, but I'd rather not even make wrong ones available in the first place.

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3  
No, you can't mark some enum constants public and some package-private. – Louis Wasserman Jul 23 '13 at 16:19
1  
In this case maybe you can use old java enums, just a class with some final static constants. – Marcelo Jul 23 '13 at 16:20
    
In fact, you can't mark them anything. They are public and that's it. – Marko Topolnik Jul 23 '13 at 16:20
    
Have you tried using a method within the enum itself to dictate whether certain values can or will be returned? It will push that extra switching logic to the enum "class" itself. – BlackVegetable Jul 23 '13 at 16:22
    
Having modifiers would break at a values() call – kiheru Jul 23 '13 at 16:34
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Sounds like the simple answer is "No."

But, thinking about the different comments and answers (particularly by Marcelo, BlackVegetable and OldCurmudgeon), I have come up with the following workaround:

A package-private enum contains all values:

enum PackagePrivateEnum {
    PUBLIC_VALUE_1,
    PUBLIC_VALUE_2,
    PUBLIC_VALUE_3,
    PACKAGE_PRIVATE_VALUE_1,
    PACKAGE_PRIVATE_VALUE_2;
}

A second public enum contains only the public values, and directly maps these to the package-private ones:

public enum PublicEnum {
    PUBLIC_VALUE_1 (PackagePrivateEnum.PUBLIC_VALUE_1),
    PUBLIC_VALUE_2 (PackagePrivateEnum.PUBLIC_VALUE_2),
    PUBLIC_VALUE_3 (PackagePrivateEnum.PUBLIC_VALUE_3);

    final PackagePrivateEnum value;

    private PublicEnum(PackagePrivateEnum value) {
        this.value = value;
    }
}

Now, if I have a function that is only allowed to return one of the public values, I define it as:

public abstract PublicEnum returnSomething();

and can then use it in the package via:

PackagePrivateEnum value = returnSomething().value;

This hides the unwanted values from the public and, I believe, simultaneously minimizes coding- and performance-overhead inside the package (e.g. no switch- or if-statements, no Map-lookups, etc., just a .value required). In fact, with a smart compiler like GWT, the return-value should probably get "inlined" to the point that even the .value-lookup is removed completely, i.e. no performance-overhead at all.

Also, with this, it is possible to define an arbitrary number of different allowed subsets of a big collective enum for different contexts: I could easily define another PublicEnum2 that exposes an entirely different set of values from the PackagePrivateEnum.

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This answer was what I was aiming at in my comment. +1 – BlackVegetable Jul 23 '13 at 17:09
    
@BlackVegetable :) Now it makes sense! I added you to the list up top... :) – Markus A. Jul 23 '13 at 17:11

You are having difficulty because you are using the wrong pattern.

Your Tasks should not return the next state. You should use a matrix of States to control the flow. This way your flow is not tangled up inside the tasks and the States remain private to the flow system.

If you want your Task to control the flow they should return something (perhaps success/failure) to influence the flow controller. They should not define the next state, they should influence the next state.

Added

Here's a slightly contrived example of what I mean. Notice how the Tasks are attached to each State and the flow is controlled by a Map that merely holds each state transition.

I have made a token effort to match your returning results but I suspect that just overcomplicates matters and once you embrace the separation of flow from state you will realise what I am trying to explain.

public class Test {
  public void test() {
    new Thread(new Engine()).start();
  }

  static final Map<State, State> flow = new HashMap<>();

  static {
    flow.put(State.Start, State.A);
    flow.put(State.A, State.B);
    flow.put(State.B, State.Finished);
  }

  public static class Engine implements Runnable {
    State state = State.Start;

    @Override
    public void run() {
      while (state != State.Finished) {
        System.out.println("State: "+state);
        // Perform all tasks of this state.
        for ( Task task : state.tasks ) {
          System.out.println("Task: "+task);
          Result result = Result.Start;
          // Keep performing until completed.
          while ( result != Result.Completed ) {
            System.out.println("Result: "+result);
            result = result.perform(task);
          }
          System.out.println("Result: "+result);
        }
        // All tasks performed! Next state.
        state = flow.get(state);
      }
      System.out.println("State: "+state);
    }
  }

  enum State {
    Start, 
    A(Task.One, Task.Two), 
    B(Task.Two), 
    Finished;
    Iterable<Task> tasks;

    State(Task... tasks) {
      this.tasks = Arrays.asList(tasks);
    }
  }

  enum Result {
    Start {
      @Override
      Result perform(Task t) {
        return t.initialise();
      }
    },
    Executing {
      @Override
      Result perform(Task t) {
        return t.execute();
      }
    },
    Finalising {
      @Override
      Result perform(Task t) {
        return t.finalise();
      }
    },
    Completed {
      @Override
      Result perform(Task t) {
        // Stop there.
        return Completed;
      }
    };

    abstract Result perform(Task t);
  }

  enum Task {
    One {
      @Override
      Result initialise() {
        return Result.Executing;
      }

      @Override
      Result execute() {
        return Result.Finalising;
      }

      @Override
      Result finalise() {
        return Result.Completed;
      }
    },
    Two {
      @Override
      Result initialise() {
        return Result.Executing;
      }

      @Override
      Result execute() {
        return Result.Finalising;
      }

      @Override
      Result finalise() {
        return Result.Completed;
      }
    };

    abstract Result initialise();

    abstract Result execute();

    abstract Result finalise();
  }

  public static void main(String args[]) {
    try {
      new Test().test();
    } catch (Throwable t) {
      t.printStackTrace(System.err);
    }
  }
}

Added

Simplifying this by removing your requirement to control the flow through the results of the task methods we get:

public class Test {
  public void test() {
    new Thread(new Engine()).start();
  }

  static final Map<State, State> flow = new HashMap<>();

  static {
    flow.put(State.Start, State.A);
    flow.put(State.A, State.B);
    flow.put(State.B, State.Finished);
  }

  public static class Engine implements Runnable {
    State state = State.Start;

    @Override
    public void run() {
      while (state != State.Finished) {
        System.out.println("State: "+state);
        // Perform all tasks of this state.
        for ( Task task : state.tasks ) {
          System.out.println("Task: "+task);
          task.initialise();
          task.execute();
          task.finalise();
        }
        // All tasks performed! Next state.
        state = flow.get(state);
      }
      System.out.println("State: "+state);
    }
  }

  enum State {
    Start, 
    A(Task.One, Task.Two), 
    B(Task.Two), 
    Finished;
    Iterable<Task> tasks;

    State(Task... tasks) {
      this.tasks = Arrays.asList(tasks);
    }
  }

  enum Task {
    One {
      @Override
      void execute() {
      }
    },
    Two {
      @Override
      void execute() {
      }
    };

    // Nothing by default.
    void initialise() {
    }

    abstract void execute();

    // Nothing by default.
    void finalise() {
    }

  }

  public static void main(String args[]) {
    try {
      new Test().test();
    } catch (Throwable t) {
      t.printStackTrace(System.err);
    }
  }
}

which, I think, demonstrates the separation of flow control from task execution I was trying to get across.

share|improve this answer
    
Basically, my Task has an initialize-, an execute- and a finalize-method. The initialize- and execute-methods return either an EXECUTING, a WAITING, a FINALIZING, or a COMPLETED state, which will cause execute() to be called next, the task to be put on hold, finalize() to be called next, or the task to be marked completed respectively. Is it really the best solution here to define a second enum with these 4 possible return values and processing that with a switch statement just to do "if WAITING, state=WAITING; if COMPLETED, state=COMPLETED; ..." Seems like a waste... – Markus A. Jul 23 '13 at 16:34
    
@MarkusA. - I've posted some code - perhaps that will help demonstrate what I mean. – OldCurmudgeon Jul 24 '13 at 23:00
    
There's some really cool ideas in this code! Thanks! Interesting idea to define the "perform" method directly on the state-enum and to have the tasks be enum-values rather than classes. Also, I had no idea that, in an enum, you can define an abstract class and implement it in one shot. Interesting. But it does seem that there's a lot of indirection and look-ups in your code and it's quite long. But it's definitely useful to see. +1 – Markus A. Jul 25 '13 at 8:16
    
I've added a simplification. – OldCurmudgeon Jul 25 '13 at 9:27

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