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Instead of

if (foo == "1" || foo == "5" || foo == "9" ... ) 

I like to combine them similar to the following (which doesn't work):

if (foo == ("1" || "5" || "9" ... ))

Is that possible?

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marked as duplicate by It'sNotALie., Jon Purdy, LeopardSkinPillBoxHat, chue x, default locale Jul 25 '13 at 4:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Just as a related aside, Perl 6 is supposed to have these (if (foo == any(1, 5, 9))), and Perl 5 code can use them too using CPAN modules search.cpan.org/perldoc?Quantum%3A%3ASuperpositions or search.cpan.org/perldoc?Perl6%3A%3AJunction This any() and all() functions are called 'junctions', and I love the idea :) –  sundar Jul 23 '13 at 21:09
    
Do yuo have dicts in c#, we have in Python so we can do: {"1": 1, "5": 1, "9": 1, .... }.gets(foo, false); its O(1). --- gets() is a dict's function that index foo key in dict and give value, else second arguments=false as default. .. I am not a c# user I came from hot question. –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 23 '13 at 21:28
4  
Another side note, python uses foo in ("1", "5", "9") which I think is less ambigous. If c# has a terse literal array syntax, perhaps the analogue would be ["1", "5", "9"].index(foo) != -1 –  tobyodavies Jul 23 '13 at 22:47
    
Won't work in all situations, so I won't post this as an answer, but for your specific example: if (int.Parse(foo) % 4 == 1) will do the trick as a good simple one-liner. Assumes in this case that foo will always be a single-digit parse-able int. Not knowing your intended use case I can't tell if that's what you'd need. –  Darrel Hoffman Jul 24 '13 at 3:05
2  
@GrijeshChauhan: if you don't need the values, then using set() is generally going to be better than a dict() whose values are always 1. –  Lie Ryan Jul 24 '13 at 15:08

8 Answers 8

up vote 168 down vote accepted

Unfortunately not, your best bet is to create an extension method

public static bool IsOneOf<T>(this T value, params T[] options)
{
    return options.Contains(value);
}

and you can use it like this:

if (foo.IsOneOf("1", "5", "9"))
{
    ...
}

Being generic, it can be used for any type (int, string etc).

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5  
If I had any more up votes for the day I'd give you a +1 friend. Good, clever solution. –  Michael Perrenoud Jul 23 '13 at 16:37
6  
It's the cleanest and most reusable of out all answers. –  walkhard Jul 23 '13 at 16:38
1  
This and more stackoverflow.com/questions/271398/… –  Tomasito Jul 23 '13 at 23:45
1  
The || operator in OP's question is a short cut operator. Does the Contains extension method exit as soon as it finds a match? Or does it iterate through the whole array? If it does not, this is preferable to the switch..case because you can use non-constant expressions. –  Boluc Papuccuoglu Jul 24 '13 at 10:23
1  
Unless optimized at compile time (such as is possible if all the values are constants), creating the params T[] array is always going to be O(N) so it will not necessarily benefit from short-circuit. –  Lie Ryan Jul 24 '13 at 15:11

You cannot do it this way. Instead you can do this:

string[] validValues = new string[] { "1", "5", "9", "whatever" };
if(validValues.Contains(foo))
{
    // do something
}
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4  
I'm not sure, but it appears somebody went through and down voted everybody's except for @Gray. –  Michael Perrenoud Jul 23 '13 at 16:30
    
:( Wasn't me, I promise. I shall go and upvote all. –  Gray Jul 23 '13 at 16:31
    
Then, as it appears, someone came in, and downvoted all (before Gray posted answer). Well, it's not the first time... –  walkhard Jul 23 '13 at 16:34
2  
not me, and I don't understand why my question was downvoted twice either.. –  KMC Jul 23 '13 at 17:04
5  
Some (not me!) might consider it basic or something that could have been answered by Google or elsewhere on the site. Or someone might just be a jerk. Or both. I gave you an upvote to undo the damage. Take that, anonymous jerk! –  thumbtackthief Jul 23 '13 at 20:48

One possible option is this:

switch (foo)
{
    case "1":
    case "5":
    case "9":
        // your code here

        break;
}

Another possible option is this:

var vals = new string[] { "1", "5", "9" };
if (vals.Contains(foo))
{
    // your code here
}
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i think its more code that foo = 1 || foo = 2 ....... –  Anonymous Mohit Jul 24 '13 at 19:12
    
@mohit, the second option wouldn't be because you'd only have to declare the array once in the class. But yeah, I've been waiting on this syntax enhancement for a decade now. –  Michael Perrenoud Jul 24 '13 at 19:21
    
would you like to consider to see my way dont you think its pretty better than the any answer given –  Anonymous Mohit Jul 24 '13 at 19:41

If all options are just one character you could do:

if ("159".IndexOf(foo) != -1)
{
  //do something
}
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1  
Hmm, interesting approach. One I've never considered. Nice. –  Michael Perrenoud Jul 23 '13 at 16:38
13  
And there goes the readability... –  RedX Jul 24 '13 at 8:11
4  
@user902383 Yes I know that, that's why I wrote: If all options are just one character on the top of my answer –  jsedano Jul 24 '13 at 14:01
    
@RedX I'm all about readability, that's why I think Trevor Pilley answer is the best one, this is great foo.IsOneOf("1", "5", "9"), I think my answer /could/ hurt readability depending on the context. –  jsedano Jul 24 '13 at 18:50

Here is yet another alternative:

bool x = new[] { "1", "5", "9" }.Any(a => a == "5"); //x == true
bool y = new[] { "1", "5", "9" }.Any(a => a == "8"); //y == false

It is better to use .Contains(foo) in this case, as the flexibility of the lambda is rather wasted here. If there was a complex expression that needed to be done, Any would be more useful.

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1  
Instead of .Any(x => x == val) I would rather use .Contains(val). –  fjdumont Jul 24 '13 at 10:31
    
I could see that. I think, for this kind of collection, it makes no difference (aside from syntax), but for certain collections, like say, a Binary Search Tree, .Contains would perform a binary search... where .Any would still go through in O(n). –  Gray Jul 24 '13 at 12:29
    
... which would be awesome, right? A binary search tree searches in O(log n) IIRC. –  fjdumont Jul 24 '13 at 13:20
    
Right, that's what I was saying. This was a helpful discussion, though. I learned the real reason to use Any over Contains. You would only really use Any() over Contains if you need a specialized lamda (which I do not have in this case). Contains() is better (worst case: the same) as Any unless you need to check something a little more complex than if the value is equal. I'll leave my answer here just as a reference for future people. –  Gray Jul 24 '13 at 13:29

You can do this, if that's acceptable to you:

if ( (new string[] {"1","9","5","6" }).Contains(foo))
{

}
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1  
Does this allocate a new array every time it runs? –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jul 23 '13 at 20:39
    
@SamuelEdwinWard: It looks like it should. I don't know if the current runtime does it but escape analysis on this line should allow it to instantly free the new array. –  Zan Lynx Jul 23 '13 at 23:42
1  
You can leave out string, the compiler will infer this automatically from the specified array values. –  Sandor Drieënhuizen Jul 24 '13 at 11:35
2  
@SamuelEdwinWard - yes it will allocate and populate a new array each time the code block is executed. If the list of allowed values is defined at compile time & essentially "static" for the lifetime of the application, you could define it as a const or static field which would reduce the GC overhead of the method if it is called frequently. –  Trevor Pilley Jul 24 '13 at 13:43

You may use the switch statement:

switch (foo) {
    case "1":
    case "5":
    case "9":
        // ...
        break;
    case "2":
    case "4":
        // ...
        break;
}

If foo is a string, pay attention on case sensitivity.

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If you have multiple if conditions you should always consider using switch statements as compiler will create Jumptables whereever possible to increase speed. You should take a look here for speed test. Thing to note here is that if number of conditions is big enough to cover overheads, C# compiler will also create a HashTable object.

So this is a better approach,

switch (foo) {
case "1":
case "5":
case "9":
    // ...
    break;
case "2":
case "4":
    // ...
    break;
}
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