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I have the following model in Django 1.5:

class Person(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=50)

Note that according to https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/models/fields/ name.blank is by default False which means it must be specified.

However, I could successfully create a Person object as follows:

Person.objects.create()

Notice the name is not specified. What is going on?

Ok, the answer from the docs is :

Note that this is different than null. null is purely database-related, whereas blank is validation-related. If a field has blank=True, form validation will allow entry of an empty value. If a field has blank=False, the field will be required.

Another catch:

Note that validators will not be run automatically when you save a model, but if you are using a ModelForm, it will run your validators on any fields that are included in your form.

It's your responsibility to call the clean methods before saving if you're not using a form.

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Firstly, whats up with this name = ... Do NOT do this. –  Games Brainiac Jul 23 '13 at 16:50
    
what do you mean? –  Lucas Tan Jul 23 '13 at 16:52
    
I believe Games is referring to the indentation. It is not recommended coding practice per PEP-8. –  bernie Jul 23 '13 at 16:53
    
@bernie Yes, exactly what I was trying to get at. –  Games Brainiac Jul 23 '13 at 16:53
    
@GamesBrainiac by the way, initially i had name = <spaces> ... because I wanted to align with other fields (removed from here) at the equal sign. –  Lucas Tan Jul 24 '13 at 1:52
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

blank only applies to form field validation as in the admin, django forms, etc.
null on the other hand is a database level nullable column.

As for why blank results in a default '', I had really just accepted it as "that's the way it works" but here's where it appears to be in django.db.models.Field

  def get_default(self):
        """
        Returns the default value for this field.
        """
        if self.has_default():
            if callable(self.default):
                return self.default()
            return force_unicode(self.default, strings_only=True)
        if (not self.empty_strings_allowed or (self.null and
                   not connection.features.interprets_empty_strings_as_nulls)):
            return None
        return ""  
        #       ^ this
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I never knew that. Learnt something new. –  Games Brainiac Jul 23 '13 at 17:18
    
@Yuji you're right. From the docs: Note that this is different than null. null is purely database-related, whereas blank is validation-related. If a field has blank=True, form validation will allow entry of an empty value. If a field has blank=False, the field will be required. –  Lucas Tan Jul 24 '13 at 1:49
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Django creates your user with an empty string. You can actually run Person.objects.all() and it will give you a list, if you save that to a variable called user_list and do something like user_list[0], it will return a user object with an empty string. I do not know how or why it does this.

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