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From my understanding of bin packing, you're trying to fit objects of predetermined and often different sizes into one or multiple containers or "bins" of a predetermined fixed size. I have a problem where, I have a single container of a fixed size and a fixed number of elements that must fit it in. The difference is that my elements are not of a fixed size, but can be resized to any multiple of a specific number. For example:

Let's say I have 3 objects or elements that must fit perfectly in a container that is 280x420 and the objects must be re-sized to multiples of 140.

Therefore, it could fit like so: (or flipped vertically)

+----------+----------+
| 140x140  | 140x140  |
|          |          |
|          |          |
+----------+----------+
| 280x280             |
|                     |
|                     |
|                     |
|                     |
+---------------------+

or: (or flipped horizontally)

+----------+----------+
| 140x210  | 140x420  |
|          |          |
|          |          |
|          |          |
+----------+          |
| 140x210  |          |
|          |          |
|          |          |
|          |          |
+----------+----------+

Eventually, the sizes of each box will be dynamically determined based on statistics. (For example, if one item has a statistic of 90% while the other two had a statistic of 2% and 8%, then obviously the 90% would get the larger box.) However, I'm trying not to over-complicate it just yet, so just creating an algorithm to fill the container is my main goal right now.

I've been researching different algorithms but have yet to come up with an ideal way to attempt this. Any pointers? Examples? Existing mathematical or other algorithms that are similar?


A more complex example would be: 6 items, container of 560x420. Element JSON: { "0": "432", "1": "389", "2": "403", "3": "190", "4": "215", "5": "832" } One possible rendering:

+----------+----------+---------------------+
| 140x280  | 140x140  | 280x140             |
| (0,1,    | (3 or 4) | (2)                 |
|    or 2) |          |                     |
|          |          |                     |
|          +----------+---------------------+
|          | 140x140  | 280x280             |
|          | (3 or 4) | (5)                 |
|          |          |                     |
|          |          |                     |
+----------+----------+                     |
| 280x210             |                     |
| (0,1, or 2)         |                     |
|                     |                     |
|                     |                     |
+---------------------+---------------------+
share|improve this question
    
When you say "determined based on statistics", do you mean frequency of occurrence? Just curious. –  voithos Jul 23 '13 at 17:41
    
Also, since bin packing in general is NP-hard, are you looking for an exact solution, or is approximation good enough? –  voithos Jul 23 '13 at 17:46
    
By "determined based on statistics", I mean I'll be pulling numbers from a database and the ones with the larger numbers will get the larger squares. Not sure exactly what you're asking in your second question. But basically, the easiest way I can explain it would if you were to imagine the Windows 8 Metro UI/Start Screen being dynamically built and having tiles that were scaled based on how frequently the user used the program (or some other available number/statistic). Each tile is scaled by some multiple to fit the grid. (Only difference is it does not have a width constraint) –  user1960364 Jul 23 '13 at 18:04

1 Answer 1

Did some more digging and found that what I'm looking for is known as "masonry". Explored that a bit and then came across Isotope, a plugin for jQuery which (hopefully) does exactly what I'm trying to do. It should be a quick study.

http://isotope.metafizzy.co/

share|improve this answer
    
This a 1d bin packer. There is also wookmark and packery. My solution is a 2d-bin packer. –  Phpdevpad Jul 24 '13 at 17:07

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