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I am working on Mac OSX and using bash as my shell. I am working in C and I am trying to create a file that will renumber files. The important part of my code is as follows:

int i;
for (i=0; i<numberOfFiles; i++) {
    strcpy(fileName,""); //Set to Null
    char append[formatLength]; //String being appended
    sprintf(append,"%%0%dd", formatLength); //example output: %04d
    strcat(fileName,filePrefix); //Attached Prefix
    strcat(fileName,append); //Attaches appended part

   //Missing code: Part which equvaluates %04d as int i, such as 0023.
}

This gets me the correct string format I am looking for (say formatLength=4): filePrefix+%04d. However, now I need to evaluate the %04d in the string and evaluate it as i, so that the files look like: file0001, file0002, etc.

Would anyone have any ideas. Thanks for your help.

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So you need to add leading zeroes? –  Jim Jul 23 '13 at 18:22
1  
Or you need to get the value 4 out of file0004? atoi(*ptr+4); –  Jim Jul 23 '13 at 18:24
    
So you want your end result to be something like this: when i=4, result is filePrefix0004; when i=123, result is filePrefix0123. Is that correct? –  wlyles Jul 23 '13 at 18:26
    
wlyles, I don't think so. I think he wants a dynamic format for his strings, based on formatlength. If there aren't many options, how about a switch? –  Jim Jul 23 '13 at 18:30
    
My earlier comment was assuming formatLength = 4. If it was 5, would you want filePrefix00004 and filePrefix00123 in my examples? –  wlyles Jul 23 '13 at 18:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understand your question correctly, you should be able to say

char result[(sizeof filePrefix/sizeof (char)) + formatLength];
sprintf(result, fileName, i);

since fileName looks something like "filePrefix%04d". Your desired filename will be then stored in result. I would not recommend re-storing it in fileNameby saying sprintf(fileName, fileName, i) because fileName may be too small (for example, when formatLength = 9).

Note that you need (sizeof filePrefix/sizeof (char)) to find the size of filePrefix (which is likely also char*), and then you add formatLength to see how many more chars you need after that

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Yep, this definitely worked. Thank you very much. –  Novice C Jul 23 '13 at 19:00
1  
sizeof(char) is always 1 so sizeof(filePrefix) + formatLength is sufficient. A char need not be 8 bits, but sizeof(char) remains 1 in any compliant implementation. A type-independent expression would be (sizeof(filePrefix)/sizeof(*filePrefix)) + formatLength –  Clifford Jul 23 '13 at 19:13

Use the string you created with snprintf() as the format string for the next call to snprintf().

int formatLength = /* some input */;
char filePrefix[FILEPREFIX_LEN]; // assigned by some input
const int FILENAME_LEN = strlen(filePrefix) + formatLength + 1; // +1 for terminating '\0'
char fileName[FILENAME_LEN];

int i;
for (i=0; i<numberOfFiles; i++) {
    char temp[TEMPLATE_LEN]; // where TEMPLATE_LEN >= FILEPREFIX_LEN + 3 + number of characters in the decimal representation of formatLength
    snprintf(temp, TEMPLATE_LEN, "%s%%0%dd", filePrefix, formatLength);
    // error check snprintf here, in case the destination buffer was not large enough
    snprintf(fileName, FILENAME_LEN, temp, i);
    // error check snprintf here, in case the destination buffer was not large enough

    // use fileName
}

So if your filePrefix = "file" then you'd get fileName = "file0001", "file0002", "file0003", and so on...

Although a lot of this work isn't actually dependant on i so you could move it outside the loop, like this:

int formatLength = /* some input */;
char filePrefix[FILEPREFIX_LEN]; // assigned by some input
const int FILENAME_LEN = strlen(filePrefix) + formatLength + 1; // +1 for terminating '\0'
char fileName[FILENAME_LEN];

char temp[TEMPLATE_LEN]; // where TEMPLATE_LEN >= FILEPREFIX_LEN + 3 + number of characters in the decimal representation of formatLength
snprintf(temp, TEMPLATE_LEN, "%s%%0%dd", filePrefix, formatLength);
// error check snprintf here, in case the destination buffer was not large enough

int i;
for (i=0; i<numberOfFiles; i++) {
    snprintf(fileName, FILENAME_LEN, temp, i);
    // error check snprintf here, in case the destination buffer was not large enough

    // use fileName
}

In these cases, your temp (short for "template", not "temporary") is going to be "prefix%04d" (e.g., for a prefixLength of 4 and filePrefix of "prefix"). You need to take care, then, that your filePrefix does not contain any characters that have special meaning to the printf family of functions. If you know a priori that it won't, then you're good to go.

However, if it's possible it will, then you need to do one of two things. You can process the filePrefix before you use it by escaping all the special characters. Or you can change your snprintf() calls to something like these:

snprintf(temp, TEMPLATE_LEN, "%%s%%0%dd", formatLength);
// other stuff...
snprintf(fileName, FILENAME_LEN, temp, filePrefix, formatLength);

Note the extra % at the beginning of the first snprintf(). This makes the template pattern "%s%04d" (e.g., for a prefixLength of 4), and then you add the filePrefix on the second call so that it's contents are not part of the pattern string in the second call.

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This doesn't address the main point, namely that the format string is dynamic, based on formatLength, which could be 4,5,6, etc. –  Jim Jul 23 '13 at 18:51
    
Thank you for suggesting snprintf, but as @Jim said, I would like the format length to be dynamic. –  Novice C Jul 23 '13 at 18:53
    
Okay, I didn't understand before... I will edit accordingly. Thanks. –  Dave Lillethun Jul 23 '13 at 19:05
    
@NoviceC See my updated code. snprintf() doesn't prevent your format length from being dynamic if you do it right, as I have shown. Although there is a chance that snprintf() will fail if your format length is a number too large to fit in the temp format string, but using sprintf() instead simply means it will overrun the buffer instead of giving an error, which will results in bugs and possibly security vulnerabilities. Therefore, it is safer to use snprintf() and have it tell you when there is a problem than to use sprintf() and not know when there is a problem. –  Dave Lillethun Jul 23 '13 at 19:34
    
@NoviceC Also, you could conservatiely make temp big enough to hold any possible formatLength, and then snprintf() shouldn't run out of space. How big does temp need to be? Well, you need space for the prefix, so strlen(filePrefix), and for the %, 0, and d, so +3, and the terminating \0, so +1 more... and finally, you need enough space to print all the digits of formatLength ...but how many is that, since you don't know a priori what its value will be? –  Dave Lillethun Jul 23 '13 at 19:40

You can build a format string then use that as a format string for another formatter call. Note they the prefix and number format specifier can be built into a single string - no need for strcat calls.

Given:

char format_specifier[256] ;

then the loop code in your example can be replaced with:

snprintf( format_specifier,
          sizeof( format_specifier),
          "%s%%0%dd",
          filePrefix, 
          formatLength ) ; // Create format string "<filePrefix>%0<formatLength>", 
                           // eg. "file%04d"

snprintf( fileName,         // Where the filename will be built
          sizeof(fileName), // The length of the filename buffer
          format_specifier, // The previously built format string
          i ) ;             // The file number.

I have assumed above that fileName is an array, if it is a pointer to an array, then sizeof(fileName) will be incorrect. Of course if you choose to use sprintf rather than snprintf it is academic.

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Like the use of snprintf(). Note: formatLength is the minimum space needed for the textual version of i, it may need more. –  chux Jul 23 '13 at 19:29
    
@chux: Doh! I made exactly the same error I commented on in the original question! Changed to just "reasonably large". –  Clifford Jul 23 '13 at 22:06

sprintf(fileNameString, fileName, i); // I think you mean this, but use snprintf()

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You are almost there

// This line could be done before the loop
sprintf(append,"%%0%dd", formatLength); //example output: %04d

// Location to store number
char NumBuffer[20];
// Form textual version of number
sprintf(NumBuffer, append, i);
strcat(fileName,filePrefix); //Attached Prefix
strcat(fileName,NumBuffer); //Attaches appended part
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