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I have an Array with available elements and an Array with required elements. I want to find out if all required elements are available.

The Arrays may contain "duplicates". Then there must be as many elements available as required. My first trial for a #contains? method fails because include? checks only if an element is available at least once

-- edit: simplified example code --

# a first and simple trial
# that fails on duplicate elements
class Array
  def contains?(other)
    other.all? { |element| include?(element) }      
  end      
end

available = [1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3]
small = [1, 1, 2, 3]  
big = [1, 1, 2, 3, 3] 

available.contains?(small) # is true as intended
available.contains?(big)   # is true but should be false
                           # because "big" contains more "3s" than "available"
share|improve this question
1  
please put some examples,and expected output with the scenarios will be helpful to answer you first. your full code is confusing.. put only the relevant part,which is not working..I didn't understand Then there must be as many elements available as required.another confusion he Arrays may contain "duplicates". - which array you are talking about ? Why your current #contains? will not work as you said #too simple, doesn't reflect duplicate elements ? –  Arup Rakshit Jul 23 '13 at 18:48
    
for each required element, check if the element is in available, if so then remove it from available. repeat for all required elements. –  akonsu Jul 23 '13 at 18:52
    
I don't understand the downvotes. Maybe it was be a bad idea to pack the two examples in a spec? –  ovhaag Jul 23 '13 at 19:11
1  
I think the main reason people dislike it is because you didn't trim down your question to the minimum relevant parts. What is crucial to your question is comparing two arrays. You should not have shown your Container class. And you introduced the attribute elements without any explanation. That was bad. I had to guess what that meant. –  sawa Jul 23 '13 at 19:24
    
Simplified the example code. –  ovhaag Apr 10 '14 at 22:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
def contains?(other)
  other.elements.group_by{|e| e}.all?{|e, a| elements.count(e) >= a.length}
end
share|improve this answer
    
Amazing. It was downvoted within one second after I posted this answer. –  sawa Jul 23 '13 at 18:56
    
Hmm. Maybe you should have posted it earlier? :-) I've given up trying to figure out the downvoters; I think they must have a surplus of points and are trying to burn some off. I gave you a +1 to balance out the universe. –  the Tin Man Jul 23 '13 at 19:33
    
@theTinMan Thanks for the help. –  sawa Jul 23 '13 at 19:36

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