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I am solving a program to delete all the elements in a linked list and i encountered the following problem:

When i used a delete function with return type void, and checked if the start pointer is NULL in the main ,it wasn't and gives me absurd result

Code:

void deletes(struct node *start)
{
    struct node *current,*next;
    current=start;
    while(current!=NULL)
    {
        next=current->link;
        free(current);
        start=next;
        current=next;
    }
    start=NULL;
    return ;
} 

But if i change the return type, it works fine:

struct node *deletes(struct node *start)
{
    struct node *current,*next;
    current=start;
    while(current!=NULL)
    {
        next=current->link;
        free(current);
        start=next;
        current=next;
    }
    start=NULL;
    return start;
}

Why is the start=NULL working in the first code?

My entire code is here

share|improve this question
1  
start = NULL; just changes the value of the argument in the function’s scope; to change it in the caller, you would need a pointer to a pointer. struct node **start and *start = NULL;. (Not that that’s necessarily a better [or even good] idea.) –  minitech Jul 23 '13 at 19:27
    
minitech is correct. Very simply, your "start" parameter (as you defined it) LIVES INSIDE OF YOUR FUNCTION. When you set start = NULL (in your first example), that changes NOTHING outside of your function. –  paulsm4 Jul 23 '13 at 19:29
    
@minitech What's wrong with passing a pointer to emulate pass-by-ref? –  user529758 Jul 23 '13 at 19:30
    
@H2CO3: Nothing, it’s just not necessarily the best way to do it. Hard to tell in this case, because the practical answer is “don’t try to display a linked list you just deleted” :) –  minitech Jul 23 '13 at 19:31
    
@minitech Well, yes, of course. I prefer assignment-to-return-value too. It's just that I sometimes think it's a valid solution. –  user529758 Jul 23 '13 at 19:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's because in the first version you pass the list header by value, meaning the pointer to the head is copied, and you change only the copy in the function. Those changes are not visible after the function returns as no changes are made on the original copy.

Either do as you do in the second version, returning the result, or pass the pointer by reference, meaning you pass the address of the pointer (or a pointer to the pointer) using the address-of operator. Of course this means that you have to change the function as well:

void deletes(struct node **start)
{
    struct node *current = *start;

    /* Deleting the list... */

    *start = NULL;
}

Call it like

struct node *list_head = ...;

deletes(&list_head);
share|improve this answer

Because in C, function arguments are passed by value. If you write start = NULL; inside a function, it will be ineffective outside of that function (it will only set the start pointer to NULL, which is essentially just a copy of the pointer value passed in, and it's local to the function.).

If you want to modify a function argument, you must pass a pointer to it. So,

void delete(struct node **start)
{
    // ... delete ...
    *start = NULL;
}

then

delete(&list);

would work.

share|improve this answer

It is because you should have (struct node **start), which can allow you to pass a pointer to the list so you can modify the list.

Currently you are only passing in a copy of the linked list to the function and therefore aren't changing the value of the actual list just a copy. Hence why when you return the copy you see the results

share|improve this answer
    
In C, you can't pass references. Only pointers. –  user529758 Jul 23 '13 at 19:38

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