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Here is an example from an IPython session where some straightforward indexing and assignments to a Pandas DataFrame work and some don't work when they seem straightforward:

In [652]: dfrm = pandas.DataFrame(np.random.rand(10,3), columns=['A', 'B', 'C'])

In [653]: dfrm
Out[653]:
          A         B         C
0  0.777147  0.558404  0.424222
1  0.906354  0.111197  0.492625
2  0.011354  0.468661  0.056303
3  0.118818  0.117526  0.649210
4  0.746045  0.583369  0.962173
5  0.374871  0.285712  0.868599
6  0.223596  0.963223  0.012154
7  0.969879  0.043160  0.891143
8  0.527701  0.992965  0.073797
9  0.553854  0.969303  0.523098

In [654]: dfrm['A'][dfrm.A > 0.5] = [1,2,3,4,5,6]

In [655]: dfrm
Out[655]:
          A         B         C
0  1.000000  0.558404  0.424222
1  2.000000  0.111197  0.492625
2  0.011354  0.468661  0.056303
3  0.118818  0.117526  0.649210
4  3.000000  0.583369  0.962173
5  0.374871  0.285712  0.868599
6  0.223596  0.963223  0.012154
7  4.000000  0.043160  0.891143
8  5.000000  0.992965  0.073797
9  6.000000  0.969303  0.523098

In [656]: dfrm[['B','C']][dfrm.A > 0.5] = 100*np.random.rand(6,2)

In [657]: dfrm
Out[657]:
          A         B         C
0  1.000000  0.558404  0.424222
1  2.000000  0.111197  0.492625
2  0.011354  0.468661  0.056303
3  0.118818  0.117526  0.649210
4  3.000000  0.583369  0.962173
5  0.374871  0.285712  0.868599
6  0.223596  0.963223  0.012154
7  4.000000  0.043160  0.891143
8  5.000000  0.992965  0.073797
9  6.000000  0.969303  0.523098

In [658]: dfrm[dfrm.A > 0.5] = 100*np.random.rand(6,3)

In [659]: dfrm
Out[659]:
           A          B          C
0  27.738118  18.812116  46.369840
1  35.335223  58.365611   7.773464
2   0.011354   0.468661   0.056303
3   0.118818   0.117526   0.649210
4  97.439481  98.621074  69.816171
5   0.374871   0.285712   0.868599
6   0.223596   0.963223   0.012154
7  53.609637  30.952762  81.379502
8  68.473117  16.261694  91.092718
9  82.253724  94.979991  72.571951

In [660]: dfrm[dfrm.A > 0.5] = 0.5*dfrm[dfrm.A > 0.5]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
AssertionError                            Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-660-35fb8e212806> in <module>()
----> 1 dfrm[dfrm.A > 0.5] = 0.5*dfrm[dfrm.A > 0.5]

/opt/epd/7.3-2_pandas0.8.1/lib/python2.7/site-packages/pandas/core/frame.pyc in __setitem__(self, key, value)
   1707             self._boolean_set(key, value)
   1708         elif isinstance(key, (np.ndarray, list)):
-> 1709             return self._set_item_multiple(key, value)
   1710         else:
   1711             # set column

/opt/epd/7.3-2_pandas0.8.1/lib/python2.7/site-packages/pandas/core/frame.pyc in _set_item_multiple(self, keys, value)
   1728     def _set_item_multiple(self, keys, value):
   1729         if isinstance(value, DataFrame):
-> 1730             assert(len(value.columns) == len(keys))
   1731             for k1, k2 in zip(keys, value.columns):
   1732                 self[k1] = value[k2]

AssertionError:

Can anyone explain why some (but not all) of these work, and why the final one actually induces as error?

Update:

We have Pandas 0.11 installed, but it's not the default version for development so it's only a sandbox sort of thing for me right now. But even when I repeat this example in 0.11, I see the same assignment problems, except that the last example now works correctly with no error. But the muddled-ness of the conventions for how to invoke the original DataFrame's __setitem__ are still there:

Python 2.7.3 |EPD 7.3-2 (64-bit)| (default, Apr 11 2012, 17:52:16)
[GCC 4.1.2 20080704 (Red Hat 4.1.2-44)] on linux2
Type "credits", "demo" or "enthought" for more information.
Hello
>>> import pandas
>>> pandas.__version__
'0.11.0'
>>> dfrm = pandas.DataFrame(np.random.rand(10,3), columns=['A', 'B', 'C'])
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'np' is not defined
>>> import numpy as np
>>> dfrm = pandas.DataFrame(np.random.rand(10,3), columns=['A', 'B', 'C'])
>>> dfrm
          A         B         C
0  0.745516  0.062613  0.147684
1  0.369141  0.447022  0.114963
2  0.820178  0.946806  0.687971
3  0.771971  0.934799  0.633633
4  0.828249  0.065587  0.848788
5  0.433796  0.740885  0.160140
6  0.663891  0.753134  0.849269
7  0.647054  0.962267  0.453865
8  0.345706  0.030634  0.058697
9  0.994135  0.990536  0.436903
>>> dfrm[dfrm.A > 0.5]
          A         B         C
0  0.745516  0.062613  0.147684
2  0.820178  0.946806  0.687971
3  0.771971  0.934799  0.633633
4  0.828249  0.065587  0.848788
6  0.663891  0.753134  0.849269
7  0.647054  0.962267  0.453865
9  0.994135  0.990536  0.436903
>>> len(dfrm[dfrm.A > 0.5])
7
>>> dfrm['A'][dfrm.A > 0.5] = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]
>>> dfrm
          A         B         C
0  1.000000  0.062613  0.147684
1  0.369141  0.447022  0.114963
2  2.000000  0.946806  0.687971
3  3.000000  0.934799  0.633633
4  4.000000  0.065587  0.848788
5  0.433796  0.740885  0.160140
6  5.000000  0.753134  0.849269
7  6.000000  0.962267  0.453865
8  0.345706  0.030634  0.058697
9  7.000000  0.990536  0.436903
>>> dfrm[['B','C']][dfrm.A > 0.5] = 100*np.random.rand(7,2)
>>> dfrm
          A         B         C
0  1.000000  0.062613  0.147684
1  0.369141  0.447022  0.114963
2  2.000000  0.946806  0.687971
3  3.000000  0.934799  0.633633
4  4.000000  0.065587  0.848788
5  0.433796  0.740885  0.160140
6  5.000000  0.753134  0.849269
7  6.000000  0.962267  0.453865
8  0.345706  0.030634  0.058697
9  7.000000  0.990536  0.436903
>>> dfrm[dfrm.A > 0.5] = 0.5*dfrm[dfrm.A > 0.5]
>>> dfrm
          A         B         C
0  0.500000  0.031306  0.073842
1  0.369141  0.447022  0.114963
2  1.000000  0.473403  0.343985
3  1.500000  0.467400  0.316816
4  2.000000  0.032794  0.424394
5  0.433796  0.740885  0.160140
6  2.500000  0.376567  0.424635
7  3.000000  0.481133  0.226933
8  0.345706  0.030634  0.058697
9  3.500000  0.495268  0.218452
>>>

Second Update:

Here's another super unexpected behavior:

In [681]: id(dfrm.A)
Out[681]: 298480536

In [682]: id(dfrm.A)
Out[682]: 298480536

In [683]: id(dfrm.A)
Out[683]: 298480536

In [684]: id(dfrm['A'])
Out[684]: 298480536

In [685]: id(dfrm['A'])
Out[685]: 298480536

In [686]: id(dfrm['A'])
Out[686]: 298480536

In [687]: id(dfrm[['A']])
Out[687]: 281536912

In [688]: id(dfrm[['A']])
Out[688]: 281535824

In [689]: id(dfrm[['A']])
Out[689]: 281536336
share|improve this question
    
could really be worth updating to 0.11 (soon 0.12), much improved indexing. I don't get any errors following this code. –  Andy Hayden Jul 23 '13 at 20:31
    
The error is one thing. But the really counterintuitive convention about dfrm[['B', 'C']] returning a new object and then calling __setitem__ whereas dfrm['A'] calls __setitem__ on the original object is very hard to understand. Especially since dfrm[dfrm.A > 0.5] also returns a new object, but somehow supports __setitem__ on the original object. –  EMS Jul 23 '13 at 20:33
    
yeah, using multiple []s is pretty hairy, and will give inconsistent, definitely recommend the upgrade for better indexing assignment. –  Andy Hayden Jul 23 '13 at 20:49
    
FYI, I think you can use .ix in 0.8.1 (similar to the way Andy uses .loc below), not 100% sure though –  Jeff Jul 23 '13 at 21:01
    
I have had far worse results and inconsistencies with .ix. I can post more, but I think reconciling the conventions between views, copies, and __setitem__ for .ix is a lost cause (again, in both versions). –  EMS Jul 23 '13 at 21:02
show 6 more comments

1 Answer

Assigning with two or more getitems/slices (chaining) may or may not work depending on the situation...
so you should avoid doing it!! You should rewrite to do each in one pass.

There was quite a substantial amount of work in 0.11 (possibly before) to clear up this behaviour... Now pandas overloads these assignments to not care if it's a view or a copy, if you are doing this in one pass, which you should be doing, in general.
For example:

dfrm.loc[dfrm.A > 0.5, 'A'] = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

dfrm.loc[[dfrm.A > 0.5], ['B','C']] = 100 * np.random.rand(6, 2)

Also, generally good practise to specify that you are indexing by the label (with the loc):

dfrm.loc[dfrm.A > 0.5] = 100 * np.random.rand(6, 3)

You could also consider rewriting:

dfrm.loc[dfrm.A > 0.5] = 0.5 * dfrm.loc[dfrm.A > 0.5]

to

dfrm.loc[dfrm.A > 0.5] *= 0.5

This is a surprising error in 0.8.1 (but seems to be fixed in later versions), perhaps a workaround (if the above doesn't work) is to set the fancy index first (df_A_gt_half = dfrm.A > 0.5) and then do the assignment using that... and are forced to use ix rather than loc.

share|improve this answer
    
On the size comment: I picked 6 specifically because in my random data set, exactly 6 points were greater than 0.5 in the 'A' column. One could easily modify that for a different random set. –  EMS Jul 23 '13 at 20:52
    
@EMS yeah, wasn't important, shouldn't have put that at the top :) –  Andy Hayden Jul 23 '13 at 20:57
    
No worries. I updated the question after trying it in our sandbox Python that has Pandas 0.11. I still see all the same oddities about when __setitem__ is invoked in the straightforward way. –  EMS Jul 23 '13 at 20:59
    
@EMS yeah, all the odities come from doing the set items multiple times, do it only once. –  Andy Hayden Jul 23 '13 at 21:04
    
? I don't understand. Where am I doing __setitem__ twice? –  EMS Jul 23 '13 at 21:08
show 2 more comments

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