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So - I have this big xml node definition in .dtd file:

<!ELEMENT def ( node1?, 
                ( node2?, 
                  node3*, 
                  ( ( node4?, 
                      (node5 | node6)?, 
                      node7?, node8?, node9?, 
                      node10*, node11?, node12* )*, 
                    node13, 
                    ( node14, node15?, node16?, 
                      node17*, node18 )?, 
                    node19*, node20? )+ )) >

I'm very confused about these parentheses and which rules would apply:

Question 1:

Can node7 show up 0 or 1 times because of the question mark, or 0 or more times because of the star sign after the enclosing parenthesis?

What would win - quantifiers right after node definition: node3*, node3+, node3? or those quantifiers that come after grouping parenthesis?

Question 2:

The parenthesis before node2? seems to be completely unnecessary - is that correct?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Parentheses in content models work just the same as they do in arithmetic expressions or any other recursive expression language -- in any given case, they may be necessary or unnecessary, and you can understand the meaning of the expression best by understanding its structure, because in any expression language meaning of an expression will normally be defined in terms of its structure.

Can node7 show up 0 or 1 times because of the question mark, or 0 or more times because of the star sign after the enclosing parenthesis?

The question mark immediately after node7 means that node7 can occur zero times or once in the given context. The asterisk after the closing parenthesis of the group (node4?, (node5 | node6)?, node7?, node8?, node9?, node10*, node11?, node12*) means that that sequence (I'll call it "the node4-12 sequence") can itself occur zero or more times.

Now, since every node in the node4-12 sequence is optional, any given occurrence of that sequence can contain exactly one node from the set of elements named in the sequence. And since the sequence can repeat arbitrarily, that means that the starred expression (node4?, ..., node12*)* in the content model is equivalent to the simpler expression (node4 | node5 | node6 | node7 | node8 | node9 | node10 | node11 | node12)*.

What would win - quantifiers right after node definition: node3*, node3+, node3? or those quantifiers that come after grouping parenthesis?

Both apply. Every occurrence indicator applies to the immediately preceding expression: in node7?, the question mark applies to the expression node7, and in the larger group (node4?, ... node12*)* the final asterisk applies to the entire node4-12 sequence.

Sometimes either the inner occurrence indicator or the outer one is redundant and can be omitted without changing the language accepted by the expression: (a*)+ is equivalent to (a*) or to (a)* or as long as it's not the entire content model to a*.

The parenthesis before node2? seems to be completely unnecessary - is that correct?

The parentheses around the group beginning with node2 and continuing through node20 are unnecessary, yes. That is, the content model as written means the same as it would mean if we deleted those parentheses. Excess parentheses like this sometimes appear in DTDs which were originally drafted using parameter entities to represent semantically significant chunks of content models, in which the parameter entities have been expanded in place.

In any content model expression, the expressions connected by comma or or-bar can be simple or arbitrarily complex. The general rule is that the parentheses for the subexpression are redundant if the subexpression has the same connector as the surrounding expression. For example (a, ((b, c), d)) is equivalent to (a, b, c, d), and ((a | b) | (c | d)) is equivalent to (a | b | c | d). You can work this out from the definitions of , and | in DTDs, if you like.

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Great answer. Thank you! –  user2568737 Jul 24 '13 at 19:02

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