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first I have a table which is pivot looks like this

pivot_product_Id | productsxx_Id | category_Id | subcategory_Id | color_Id
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
       1         |        1        |      1    |      1         |   1
       2         |        1        |      1    |      1         |   2
       3         |        3        |      1    |      1         |   3
       4         |        4        |      1    |      2         |   4
       5         |        4        |      1    |      2         |   5
       6         |        2        |      2    |      4         |   6
       7         |        5        |      2    |      5         |   7

and I have color table like this

color_Id   | color   |  color2
------------------------------------------
    1      |  black   | white
    2      |  blue    | orange
    3      |  white   | black
    4      |  purple  | black
    5      |  black   | green
    6      |  red     | black

and my question is in category ID 1 or 2 ... how many black color exist ? Counting from both color and color2 columns

and I tryed something like this but not geting the result I want and need help to create right query.

if(isset($shoes_post_var) || isset($nightwear_post_var)|| isset($outwear_post_var)){

                    $query3 = "SELECT count(*)
                FROM pivot
            JOIN category ON
                pivot.category_Id = category.category_Id
            JOIN subcategory ON
                pivot.subcategory_Id = subcategory.subcategory_Id       
            JOIN color ON
                pivot.color_Id = color.color_Id

            JOIN productsxx ON      
                pivot.productsxx_Id = productsxx.productsxx_Id
            WHERE  
             color IN ('$black') 
            or
             color2 IN ('$black')
            AND
            category IN ('$shoes_post_var','$nightwear_post_var','$outwear_post_var')
            GROUP BY pivot.color_Id  ASC ";
        $query5 = mysql_query($query3)or die(mysql_errno());
            $total = mysql_result($query5, 0);  
        echo ' '.'('.$total.')';}
share|improve this question
    
Create and debug query as a plain text in phpmyadmin, mysql console or your favourite DB management tool. ONLY AFTER you get the query that works - move it to php. The same for questions - if you ask about mysql, remove everything that isn't relevant to query - any php code in this case. –  zerkms Jul 23 '13 at 22:21
    
using phpmyadmin,gona look at it. –  samuel Jul 23 '13 at 22:24
    
so how about showing the real query? –  zerkms Jul 23 '13 at 22:39
    
I just add the php for to show and be clear to What I mean –  samuel Jul 23 '13 at 22:51
    
it doesn't make it clear. If you're asking about a sql query - then another irrelevant code makes understanding harder –  zerkms Jul 23 '13 at 22:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A possible solution

SELECT COUNT(*) total
  FROM pivot 
 WHERE category_id IN (1, 2)
   AND color_id IN
( 
  SELECT color_id
    FROM color
   WHERE color = 'black' 
      OR color2 = 'black'
)

Here is SQLFiddle demo

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very clear –  samuel Jul 23 '13 at 22:40
    
@samuel You're very welcome. I'm glad I could help :) –  peterm Jul 23 '13 at 22:42
    
You do realise that sub-select is usually much slower than a join. –  Aleks G Jul 23 '13 at 23:27
    
@AleksG Usually doesn't mean that it's true in that particular case, does it? Although I agree in general. –  peterm Jul 23 '13 at 23:41

You only described two tables and asked about a query based on these two tables. This is a matter of a simple join with a simple selection - and a count - something like this:

SELECT count(1)
FROM pivot
JOIN color ON (pivot.color_id=color.color_id AND 'black' in (color.color, color.color2))
WHERE pivot.category_id = 1

Feel free to change the where clause for other categories.

However your existing code joins 5 tables and uses some other selection criteria. You really do need to ask the right question. Don't try to ask one thing while implying another.

share|improve this answer
1  
DBMS do have optimizations for COUNT(*) while COUNT(1) would be treated as COUNT() applied for the 1 integer literal which is just confusing and doesn't have any real reason to use, or does it? –  zerkms Jul 23 '13 at 22:30
    
Thanks for your answer –  samuel Jul 23 '13 at 22:41
    
@zerkms Not sure about optimisation for count(*) but for the past 20 years I've been taught that count(1) is faster. This is due to the fact that for count(*) an index or a table (if no index exists) scan is required to retrieve values, while count(1) users internal row id's - which is quicker. Last time I did a like-for-like comparison on a postgres table with 100 million rows, count(1) was about 5 times faster than count(*) –  Aleks G Jul 23 '13 at 23:30
1  
"This is due to the fact that for count(*) an index or a table (if no index exists) scan is required to retrieve values" --- it's not. Mysql doesn't do a scan for COUNT(*). "Last time I did a like-for-like comparison on a postgres table with 100 million rows, count(1) was about 5 times faster than count(*)" --- I don't believe that until I see the execution plans for that :-) –  zerkms Jul 23 '13 at 23:44
1  
To be even more precise: there is a special case COUNT_SYM '(' opt_all '*' ')' in mysql's SQL parser. Which (surprise for me!!!) uses Item *item= new (YYTHD->mem_root) Item_int((int32) 0L,1); as a parameter :-) So seems like for mysql COUNT(*) is absolutely identical to COUNT(0) –  zerkms Jul 23 '13 at 23:55

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