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Just started using Doxygen for documenting my code here and can't decide where to put them.

At first look it seems better to put them in the declaration files as it is there where you actually declare what you receive, what you are going to return and stuff like that, apart from that things like data members that are only in the declaration files can obviously only documented there.

But often I find handier to comment methods in the implementation files as they are more accessible to me and the declaration file doesn't get cluttered with dozens of lines of comments making it harder to find what you look for when developing.

What is your experience with that?

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closed as not constructive by Flexo, casperOne Nov 19 '12 at 17:44

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I prefer to place comments above the definitions because it is helpful to me, the developer/maintainer, while editing the code. If I need to share the documented interface with someone, then I give the Doxygen docs. –  synaptik Nov 18 '12 at 19:33

9 Answers 9

up vote 11 down vote accepted

TL;DR: Comments with declaration.

I have experience with both styles. Also a third where the documentation was split: @brief and @param in the header and all the rest in the source file, very bizarre. Currently, I prefer to put all Doxygen comments with the declaration and think I'll stick with that preference. I keep finding more reasons to keep doing it this way.

Doxygen with the declaration favors users of the library. Where Doxygen with the definition favors maintainers/enhancements. In my experience there are far more users of a library than there are maintainers.

I always treat my code as a library for other users. The old adage that a year from now you will be the other user is very true. While I am writing the class and I need quick reference of a class's interface, its definition is plenty good enough. In this case the Doxygen comments in the header is just distracting. However, regular users find the declarations to be insufficient to answer their questions. So they'll have to find the definitions as well to get at the rest of the comments.

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We prefer them as close to the implementation as possible. The rationale for this being that it increases the probability that the code and documentation stays in sync.

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I've seen projects that put all their documentation at the start of the implementation file, which is probably the worst you can do, as anyone reading the source and wanting explanation has to go look it up in hundreds of lines of ducumentation. Or go to the website or whatever.

Declaration is probably the best place.

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I prefer to keep the interface as clean as possible. The interface should explain itself ...
If prefer to put the documentation in the implementation file.

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IMHO, for interfaces, libraries, components its much better to add comments in the .h file. so that the .h gets distributed. Plus if you put comments in .h file, it will be shown in the Visual Studio, when you hover over a function call, as a tooltip.

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I like to put them in the declaration: I usually look on a .h to know how to call a function, not in the implementation. Furthermore, if you distribute your code, people will have access to the header but not to the implementation.

Of course you could comment in both, but I think it's a bad idea as you would have to maintain it coherent ;)

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Seems to be a personal style choice (or a corporate style rule).

I'm leaning towards implementation personally as I like to look at the class declaration and see all the methods and fields on one screen, like a photo of the class "snap!".

And like one of the people said above, if you name things well, and maybe put a little // end of line comment, or just a /// brief doxygen comment .. that should be enough to show what the func does, and if you want more info, read the doxygen html output, no need to dive into the definition.

The one downside I can think of using the below style is, long long lines.

Example of what I call elegant/nice:

/**
* @brief Holds just a reference to a mongodb grid file and it's chunks
*/
class BaseGridFile : public DBStatusHolder {
protected:
    const BaseGridFS& gridFS;
    BSONElement id_;
public:
    BaseGridFile(const BaseGridFS& gridFS);     /// Create a new grid file, passing a reference to the parent GridFS object
    chunk_count_type chunkCount() const;        /// The number of chunks in the file
    BaseGridChunk getChunk(chunk_count_type number=1) const; /// Get a reference object to a chunk by it's `number`
    string getChunkData(chunk_count_type number=1) const; /// Get actual chunk data by its number
    void save(bool safe=false);                 /// Save all changes to DB. @param safe lets means don't return until save is sure
    void load(BSONElement fileId);              /// Load a set of file data from the DB (not the chunks)
    const GridFS& getGridFS() const { return gridFS; } /// Return the parent GridFS object
};

Then in the implementation do the full comment doxygen comment block.

Or if it's a smallish class like that, you can put the comments between lines and still see all the methods on one screen:

/**
* @brief Holds just a reference to a mongodb grid file and it's chunks
*/
class BaseGridFile : public DBStatusHolder {
protected:
    const BaseGridFS& gridFS;
    BSONElement id_;
public:
    /// Create a new grid file, passing a reference to the parent GridFS object
    BaseGridFile(const BaseGridFS& gridFS);     
    /// The number of chunks in the file
    chunk_count_type chunkCount() const;        
    /// Get a reference object to a chunk by it's `number`
    BaseGridChunk getChunk(chunk_count_type number=1) const; 
    /// Get actual chunk data by its number
    string getChunkData(chunk_count_type number=1) const; 
    /// Save all changes to DB. @param safe lets means don't return until save is sure
    void save(bool safe=false);                 
    /// Load a set of file data from the DB (not the chunks)
    void load(BSONElement fileId);              
    /// Return the parent GridFS object
    const GridFS& getGridFS() const { return gridFS; } 
};
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I work with Xcode these days and found out the following:

1.0 Scenario: Comments in declaration and definition = Doxygen puts both into the documentation.

2.0 Scenario: Comment in declaration or definition = Doxygen puts it into the documentation.

3.0 Scenario: Class comes with and interface/protocol that yields the comments in .h 3.1. Scenario: Comments only come from the interface declaration. = Doxygen puts the comments to the documentation.

3.2. Scenario: New comments are added to the implementation of the interface = Doxygen substitutes the interface comments with the implementation comments. The implementation comments have precedence.

3.3. Scenario: You add the declaration of the interface methods to your .h and put new comments = Doxygen substitutes the interface comments with the declaration comments of your class. The declaration comments have precedence.

3.4. Scenario: You add the declaration of the interface methods to your .h and put new in your declaration and definition. = Doxygen puts both into the documentation.

Now I ask myself if one would put all derived methods into my own declaration file like described in scenario 3.x. I more and more tend to put the comments into the definition file since all the magic happens there. By this I also would never miss a method to be documentated.

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