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I've been having some trouble understanding this whole structure of JPanel, JFrame, and graphics class, and extending and overriding and such. I seemed to have everything working, until I added the graphics class and then my buttons and such on my JPanel/JFrame didn't show up anymore. I figured out it has something to do with overriding or super? But I really need some clarification. Thanks so much!

I've narrowed down the code a bit for easy viewing.

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Image;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;

import javax.swing.ImageIcon;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.border.TitledBorder;

public class windowBuild extends JFrame {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
    private JPanel contentPane;
    private int energy = 4;
    private JButton btnClaw = new JButton("Claw");
    private Image bg;
    private boolean loaded = false;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                windowBuild frame = new windowBuild();
                frame.setVisible(true);

            }
        });
    }

    private class ButtonHandler implements ActionListener {

        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            String which = e.getActionCommand();
            if (which.equals("Claw")) {
                energy = energy - 1;
                System.out
                        .println("Player one's dragon clawed the opponent. Dragon's energy is now at: "
                                + energy);
            }

        }

    }

    public void loadImage() {
        bg = new ImageIcon("C:\\res\\dragonDuelBackground.jpeg").getImage();
        loaded = true;
        repaint();
    }

    public windowBuild() {
        ButtonHandler bh;
        System.out.println("Starting frame...");
        bh = new ButtonHandler();
        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setBounds(100, 100, 800, 600);
        contentPane = new JPanel();
        contentPane.setBorder(new TitledBorder(null, "Dragon Duel",
                TitledBorder.CENTER, TitledBorder.TOP, null, Color.CYAN));
        setContentPane(contentPane);
        contentPane.setLayout(null);

        btnClaw.setBounds(273, 511, 109, 39);
        contentPane.add(btnClaw);
        btnClaw.addActionListener(bh);

    }
//********************************************************************
//  public void paint(Graphics g) {
//      if (loaded) {
//          g.drawImage(bg, 400, 400, null);
//      }
//  }
//***************Uncomment this and the code won't work anymore**********
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Uncomment this and the code won't work anymore

Don't override paint() of a top level container (JFrame, JDialog...). Custom painting is done by overriding the paintComponent() method of a JPanel (or JComponent). Then you add the panel to the frame. Don't forget to invoke super.paintComponent(...).

Read the Swing tutorial on Custom Painting tutorial for more information and examples.

share|improve this answer
    
The tutorials very good. Thanks. –  user2605100 Jul 24 '13 at 15:28
  1. Avoid extending directly from JFrame. You're not adding any new functionality to the frame and you're restricting the re-usability of your UI if you do (as you can't add frames to anything else)
  2. Don't override paint of top level containers. There are lots of good reasons, but the main problem is that the frame containers a number of different layers (JLayeredPane, contentPane) which may paint over anything you do
  3. You MUST call super.paintXxx to ensure that the paint chain remains intact.

Instead, create a seperate class (extending from something like JPanel for example) and override it's paintComponent method. Or better still. Simple use a JLabel to display the image

Take a look at Performing Custom Painting and Painting in AWT and Swing for more details.

Also, I don't see any where you are calling loadImage, so the image is never loaded

I would also recommend that you take a read through Reading/Loading an Image using ImageIO, which will throw an Exception when it can't read the image file, which is far more useful then ImageIcon which simply fails silently

Updated with simple example

enter image description here

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Graphics2D;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.awt.image.BufferedImage;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import javax.imageio.ImageIO;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;
import javax.swing.border.TitledBorder;

public class TestGraphics {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TestGraphics();
    }

    public TestGraphics() {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.getSystemLookAndFeelClassName());
                } catch (ClassNotFoundException | InstantiationException | IllegalAccessException | UnsupportedLookAndFeelException ex) {
                }

                JFrame frame = new JFrame("Testing");
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                frame.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
                frame.add(new TestPane());
                frame.pack();
                frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
                frame.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }

    public class TestPane extends JPanel {

        private int energy = 4;
        private JButton btnClaw = new JButton("Claw");
        private BufferedImage bg;

        public TestPane() {
            setBackground(Color.WHITE);
            try {
                bg = ImageIO.read(new File("dragon.gif"));
            } catch (IOException ex) {
                ex.printStackTrace();
            }

            ButtonHandler bh;
            bh = new ButtonHandler();
            setBorder(new TitledBorder(null, "Dragon Duel",
                    TitledBorder.CENTER, TitledBorder.TOP, null, Color.CYAN));
            setLayout(new BorderLayout());

            JPanel buttonPane = new JPanel();
            buttonPane.setOpaque(false);
            buttonPane.add(btnClaw);

            add(buttonPane, BorderLayout.SOUTH);
            btnClaw.addActionListener(bh);
        }

        @Override
        public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
            return bg == null ? new Dimension(200, 200) : new Dimension(bg.getWidth(), bg.getHeight());
        }

        @Override
        protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
            super.paintComponent(g);
            if (bg != null) {
                Graphics2D g2d = (Graphics2D) g.create();
                int x = (getWidth() - bg.getWidth()) / 2;
                int y = (getHeight() - bg.getHeight()) / 2;
                g2d.drawImage(bg, x, y, this);
                g2d.dispose();
            }
        }

        private class ButtonHandler implements ActionListener {

            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                String which = e.getActionCommand();
                if (which.equals("Claw")) {
                    energy = energy - 1;
                    System.out
                            .println("Player one's dragon clawed the opponent. Dragon's energy is now at: "
                            + energy);
                }

            }
        }
    }
}

Ps- You better have very good reason to be not using a layout manager

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It helped a lot. –  user2605100 Jul 24 '13 at 15:29
    
Could you change the code and show me. I understand what you're saying, but now I'm struggling with what to put where, inside the main class or in its own? –  user2605100 Jul 24 '13 at 16:13

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