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I'm trying to write a generic cached property accessor like the following but am getting a compiler error when trying to check whether the storage variable already contains a value:

function TMyClass.GetProp<T>(var ADataValue: T; const ARetriever: TFunc<T>): T;
begin
  if ADataValue = Default(T) then // <-- compiler error on this line
    ADataValue := ARetriever();
  Result := ADataValue;
end;

The error I'm getting is "E2015 Operator not applicable to this operand type".

Would I have to put a constraint on T to make this work? The help file says that Default() would accept anything except generic types. In my case I'm dealing mostly with simple types like String, Integer and TDateTime.

Or is there some other library function to perform this particular check?

I'm using Delphi 2009 in case that matters.


P.S.: Just in case it isn't clear from the code what I'm trying to do: In my case determining the actual property values might take a while for various reasons and sometimes I might not even need them at all. On the plus side however the values are constant so I only want to call the code that determines the actual value the first time that property is accessed and then store the value in a class field and the next time that property is accessed return the cached value directly. Here's an example of how I hoped I would be able to use that code:

type
  TMyClass = class
  private
    FSomeProp: String;
    function GetSomeProp: String;

    function GetProp<T>(var ADataValue: T; const ARetriever: TFunc<T>): T;
  public
    property SomeProp read GetSomeProp;
  end;

function GetSomeProp: String;
begin
  Result := GetProp<String>(FSomeProp,
                            function: String
                            begin
                              Result := SomeSlowOrExpensiveCalculation;
                            end);
end;

(obviously, there's more than just one property)

share|improve this question
    
+1 nice idea by the way. – jpfollenius Nov 23 '09 at 13:07
1  
You should probably use a nullable type, otherwise the code would constantly re-evaluate properties that are already cached but have the default value. See for example blogs.embarcadero.com/abauer/2008/09/18/38869 – mghie Nov 23 '09 at 15:01
    
@mghie: Good point and usually I would agree but in this particular case the default value can safely always be interpreted as "uninitialized". – Oliver Giesen Nov 23 '09 at 15:04
up vote 6 down vote accepted

After a hint in the comments from Binis and digging around a little in Generics.Collections I came up with the following which appears to work just as I wanted it:

function TMyClass.GetProp<T>(var ADataValue: T; const ARetriever: TFunc<T>): T;
var
  lComparer: IEqualityComparer<T>;
begin
  lComparer := TEqualityComparer<T>.Default;
  if lComparer.Equals(ADataValue, Default(T)) then
    ADataValue := ARetriever();
  Result := ADataValue;
end;
share|improve this answer

As I understand things it looks like u want to do some kind of memoize functionality. If this is the case just read this article

http://blogs.teamb.com/craigstuntz/2008/10/01/37839/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This is indeed very similar to what I'm trying to do but Craig's implementation would result in too big an unnecessary overhead in my particular case because it would instantiate one new TDictionary instance for every property... It's unfortunately also not an answer to the original question of how to test whether a generically typed variable has a non-default value or not, so given that context I'm afraid I couldn't even upvote your answer. :( – Oliver Giesen Nov 23 '09 at 12:36
    
You could avoid this overhead by using something like a TCacheManager. The cache manager has one dictionary. Just use something like IntToStr (Integer (Pointer (Self))) + '.Property1' as the key and register your cached values. – jpfollenius Nov 23 '09 at 13:04
3  
Well the only "legal" way to compare generics is to do what Delphi does in Generics.Collections.pas. Take a look at QuickSort implementation. – Binis Nov 23 '09 at 13:19
    
You can aways do the following function TMyClass<T>.IsEqualWithDefault(Item: T): boolean; var def : T; begin def := Default(T); result := CompareMem(@Item, @def, SizeOf(T)); end; but I doubt it will suit your case – Binis Nov 23 '09 at 13:26
    
@Smasher: The main problem I see with using a dictionary for my use case is that a dictionary would have to have a fixed value type while I need multiple result types. BTW: Is TCacheManager something that is already available somewhere? I haven't been able to find that in the VCL sources... – Oliver Giesen Nov 23 '09 at 14:14

The problem is not the Default function, but the equality operator =.

You could constrain T to IEquatable and use the Equals method like this:

TMyClass = class
  function GetProp<T : IEquatable<T>>(var ADataValue: T; const ARetriever: 
end;
...
function TMyClass.GetProp<T>(var ADataValue: T; const ARetriever: TFunc<T>): T;
begin  
if ADataValue.Equals (Default(T)) then
  ADataValue := ARetriever();  
Result := ADataValue;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure why but I get an "Undeclared identifier 'IEquatable'" with that code (even though I can see IEquatable is indeed declared in System.pas). I would however doubt this would work for me anyways as I am not aware that primitive types like String, TDateTime or Integer somehow implicitly support that interface... – Oliver Giesen Nov 23 '09 at 11:48
    
@Oliver: you're right, you can't use that for primitive types. Unfortunately, I am not aware of another solution. Let's see if others are able to help. I don't know why you get an error message when using IEquatable. – jpfollenius Nov 23 '09 at 12:42
    
Actually, what is declared in System.pas is not IEquatable but IEquatable<T> which explains the error... GetProp<T: IEquatable<T>>(... does compile but then, as expected, I get the error when passing String for T: "Type parameter 'T' must support interface IEquatable<System.string>" – Oliver Giesen Nov 23 '09 at 12:46

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