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The situation is that some member function bar::Bar::frobnicate wants to utilize ADL to find a function from some unknown namespace, within a function that has an identical name. However, it only finds its own name.

Testcase

(Note that in reality, Bar is a Foo-agnostic template; this is just the reproducible, minimal testcase)

namespace foo {
    struct Foo {};
    void frobnicate(Foo const &) {}
}

namespace bar {
    struct Bar {
        void frobnicate() {
            foo::Foo foo;
            frobnicate(foo); // <-- error
        }
    };
}

int main () {
    bar::Bar x;
    x.frobnicate();
    frobnicate(foo::Foo());
}

Results in:

test.cc: In member function ‘void bar::Bar::frobnicate()’:
test.cc:10:31: error: no matching function for call to ‘bar::Bar::frobnicate(foo::Foo&)’
test.cc:10:31: note: candidate is:
test.cc:8:18: note: void bar::Bar::frobnicate()
test.cc:8:18: note:   candidate expects 0 arguments, 1 provided

Standard

I understand that this is correct compiler behaviour:

3.4.1 Unqualified name lookup [basic.lookup.unqual]

(...) name lookup ends as soon as a declaration is found for the name (...)

and only after unqualified lookup failed, argument dependent lookup comes into play:

3.4.2 Argument-dependent name lookup [basic.lookup.argdep]

When the postfix-expression in a function call (5.2.2) is an unqualified-id, other namespaces not considered during the usual unqualified lookup (3.4.1) may be searched

Workaround

My current workaround is to introduce a special traits class that does not define the clashing name itself:

    struct BarTraits {
        void frobnicate_(foo::Foo const &b) {
            frobnicate(b);
        }
    };

or this ligher version:

    void frobnicate_(foo::Foo const &c) { frobnicate(c); }

Question

Are there better alternatives than introducing such traits classes?

Explicitly qualifying the call as foo::frobnicate(foo) is not an option here, because (as mentioned) the Bar class is a template upon Foo in reality and should not only work for types in the foo namespace.

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Btw, I just mailed to Herb Sutter a question about how to propose C++ features. If you have a quick info on that, I'd very much appreciate that :) –  phresnel Jul 24 '13 at 6:14
    
+1 for making me lookup ADL, I learnt something new today! –  legends2k Jul 24 '13 at 7:11
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As you found out yourself, adding a member function frobnicate to the class interface of Bar (or Bar<T> in the template case), will prevent ADL from finding foo::frobnicate.

The easiest -and in this case idiomatic- way to add frobnicate functionality to a class Bar (or to a class template Bar<T>) is to add a non-member function frobnicate(Bar) (or function template frobnicate(Bar<T>)) to the namespace bar

namespace foo {
    struct Foo {};
    void frobnicate(Foo const &)  {}
}

namespace bar {
    template<class T>
    struct Bar {    
       T t;    
    }; 

    template<class T>
    void frobnicate(Bar<T> const& b)
    {
        frobnicate(b.t);    
    }
}

int main () {
    bar::Bar<foo::Foo> x;
    frobnicate(x);
    frobnicate(foo::Foo());
}

If you insist on having a member function, you will have to rename it to something like do_frobnicate(). I would not use type traits tricks to get the same behavior as it is an indirect approach, and makes the class interfaces much harder to understand (remember Stroustrup's motto: "represent your ideas directly in code").

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The thing with the member function is that I wanted my Bar to also satisfy some abstract interface (it's declaration looks like template<typename T, typename Base> class Bar, and it is basically a container of T). I think it would indeed be cleanest to not implement that abstract interface and have a free function, and then reuse Bar as a member in something that implements Base, but I have to think about it a bit more. +1 so far. –  phresnel Jul 24 '13 at 6:39
    
@phresnel It is indeed important to consider that type of interface Bar is supposed to have. It is also important to consider whether foo and bar are related enough to be merged. See e.g. this old Sutter column What's in a class. –  TemplateRex Jul 24 '13 at 6:42
    
To give more insight: The real situation is a Ray Tracer. I have shapes and primitives, where a shape is just a shape, and a primitive is a bit like a shape, but adds materials. The Bar in fact is a "Bounding Interval Hierarchy" (a tree structure). To avoid code duplication, the BIH is generic enough to be able to be a shape, or a primitive, or even something else. That is, foo and bar are unfortunately not related anough, foo can actually be a Sphere, a Triangle, or even another, nested BIH. I think, currently the cleanest way is to provide a sort of container adapters, which ... –  phresnel Jul 24 '13 at 6:49
    
... implement a Shape interface and a Primitve interface for my generic BIH, so I would not be using the BIH directly, and just accept that my BIH-implementation is just a toolbox to implement real containers on it. –  phresnel Jul 24 '13 at 6:50
1  
@legends2k the public data member was just for illustration purposes. in production code, it could be hidden behind a getter() –  TemplateRex Jul 24 '13 at 7:46
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you can use this trick

namespace dummy { void your_func(may be some parameteres); }
struct bar { 
   void member() {
      using dummy::your_func; // now your call will find that and ADL will kick in
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