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In a Django application, I have some checks in a form which will return error = "something".
The thing is that that error will not be defined unless there is any error.

mycharacters = Character.objects.filter(username_id=request.user.id)

if(mycharacters.count() >= 5):
    error = True
if not error:
    #save to DB

The problem is that if there is no error, error variable will not exist.

I have also thought about a possibility in order to avoid this error, which would be:

error = None
#checks here
if error == None:
    #save to DB

But I am not sure whether this would be best approach.

Is there any way to do if error var does not exist: in Python?

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1  
Just a note from the PEP 8: Comparisons to singletons like None should always be done with is or is not, never the equality operators. –  Haidro Jul 24 '13 at 9:18
    
@Haidro Thanks for the tip. –  anon Jul 24 '13 at 9:20
    
There is a way of doing "if error var does not exist" in Python: you do try: error; except NameError: …. However, as the accepted answer shows, this is not the simplest solution to your need. –  EOL Jul 24 '13 at 9:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do following:

error = mycharacters.count() >= 5
if not error:
    ...

UPDATE

error = mycharacters.count() >= 5
if error:
    to_json = {"incorrect":"Excedeed maximum"}
else:
    # Save to DB
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1  
What if I need to add an extra line below the error = True? –  Jerry Jul 24 '13 at 9:17
    
@Jerry, For example..? –  falsetru Jul 24 '13 at 9:21
    
Writing a an specific error like to_json = {"incorrect":"Excedeed maximum"} –  Jerry Jul 24 '13 at 9:22
    
@Jerry, I added a code. –  falsetru Jul 24 '13 at 9:26
    
Interesting two alternatives approaches, although I'll have to stick to mine as I have more than one thing to check. I guess that no other cleaner options are possible. Thanks @falsetru :) –  Jerry Jul 24 '13 at 9:29

Either use an else branch:

if mycharacters.count() >= 5:
    error = True
else:
    error = False

or initialize the variable to the least likely value, and reassign:

error = False
if mycharacters.count() >= 5:
    error = True

The latter is often easier to read, but both approaches work (and so does the single-expression variant seen in other answers, even if that's harder to expand if you need to do more things).

(note that if you need to do more than just a simple assignment to establish the "false" value, the if/else construct usually wins, but in this case the cost of assigning twice is marginal.)

Checking if a variable exists can be done, but is verbose and bad programming style. Missing variables should be considered programming errors, not hidden program state.

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It is because when your first condition (first if) gets failed then, that block won't execute hence there will not be any variable with name error, after that your second condition and there python interpreter doesn't get any variable with the name error, that is why it was giving the that error refereced before assignment.

mycharacters = Character.objects.filter(username_id=request.user.id)

if(mycharacters.count() >= 5):
    error = True
if not error:
    #save to DB

hence before if(mycharacters.count() >= 5) you can set a variable error with default value of False and set it to True only when the condition become true.

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