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I ported my library form jQuery to Q.js and at the same time re-wrote my unit-test from QUnit to Jasmine.js and now facing some issue:

  • Because of the fact that all promise-objects are resolved async (setTimeout( func, 0 )) I have to write not so nice unit-tests with "runs" and "waitsFor".
  • The "jasmine.Clock.useMock" approch is not working (at leased two weeks ago)

So my question is how to test my library that uses Q.js with Jasmine.js?

Update 1: You can find my unit-tests here. See test "'The "Retrieve" method of the kit allows the laoding of single record'" The library is used for CRUD operations in context of Dynamics CRM 2011.

Update 2: It seems that the setTimeout is not my only "problem". Q.js will use "setImmediate" or "MessageChannel" or "setTimeout" for resolving the async operation.

share|improve this question
    
Could you please post at least one example of your code? –  Andreas Köberle Jul 24 '13 at 10:05
    
@AndreasKöberle: See update & link. –  thuld Jul 24 '13 at 17:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are unit-testing you should not bother about the clock.

Suppose we have something like this:

var obj = {
  functionToTest: function () {
    callServer().then(function () {
      //success
    }, function () {
      //error
    })
  }
}

To test it we would need to modify the clock. One option to avoid it is to modify timeout to resolve the functions syncronously.

var aux = window.setTimeout; //save to restore later
window.setTimeout = function(func){
  func();
};

Most times using a fake timout would produce the same result, but some times it may fail:

var obj = {
  functionToTest: function () {
    var foo = 'bar';
    callServer().then(function () {
      alert(foo);
    }, function () {
      //error
    })
    foo = 'buz';
  }
}

When used normal it will alert buz but with the fake timeout it will alert bar. Use this option with caution.

When you use the Q promises you are specifying a success callback and an error callback, and they don't need to be in the tested function.

var obj = {
  functionToTest: function () {
    callServer().then(this.success, this.error)
  },

  success: function () {
    //success
  }
  error: function () {
    //error
  }
}

Now, using the fake timeout, you can test that the success and the error functions are called and then test the success and error functions.

If you need some data from the tested function in the callbacks you can use closures:

var obj = {
  functionToTest: function () {
    var data = 'foo';
    callServer().then(this.success(data), this.error)
  },

  success: function (data) {
    var that = this;
    return function () {
      //we have access to data and the object
    }
  }
  error: function () {
    //error
  }
}

When unit-testing you check the output of the function for a specified input. If the tested function is calling a function that returns a promise it means that the output of the tested function was the call to that function, so it is what should be tested. Later you should test the callbacks.

In the example I would test that I'm calling callServer with the expected data and then test the callbacks.

If you need to use "runs" and "waitsFor" (or other similar options) it means that you are not making unit-testing, you are making functional or integration testing.

Unit tests ensure that each part of the project is working correctly, and the integration tests ensure that all parts work ok toghether.

If a unit test is too complex, it means that you should modify what you are programing to make it testable.

EDIT:

For the tests you comment I'd do:

var aux;
beforeEach(function () {
    aux = window.setTimeout;

    window.setTimeout = function(func){
      func();
    };
});

afterEach(function () {
    window.setTimeout = aux;
});


it('should return a single object', function () {
    CrmRestKit.Retrieve(entitySchemaName, fakeid, columns).then(function (data) {
        expect(data.d).not.toBeArray();
    });
});

it('will return the fake-account', function () {
    CrmRestKit.Retrieve(entitySchemaName, fakeid, columns).then(function (data) {
        expect(data.d).toBe(fakeAccount);
    });
});

EDIT 2:

What I was offering with the setTimeout solution was a fast workarround but not the most pure "unit-testing" solution, and many times it works and keeps the tests simple, but not this time.

With your tests you are testing Q and ajax implementation in addition to your code, and that's what's making the tests complicated.

The fast solution improved:

Let's remove the promise implementation from the equation and consider that it will do its job.

You are currently expecting to get, from the promise, the data you recieve from the ajax call. Why don't you test that the "resolve" function of the promise is called with the expected data?

The unit-test solution:

Do not test 3rd party implementations and consider that they will do their job.

I'd do 3 tests: one to check that Retrieve returns a promise, a second one to check that it is calling the ajax with the data that the server needs and then a last one on the callback function to check that it calls the resolve with the expected data (see my first answer for the callback test).

share|improve this answer
    
quite insightful. thank you. –  Eliran Malka Jul 24 '13 at 12:46
    
Ok, I get your point. But form my point of view this is unit-testing. I use a mock to describe some part of the application and test only the "output". Take a look at the test "'will return the fake-account'" (crmrestkit.codeplex.com/SourceControl/latest#unittesting/spec/…) –  thuld Jul 24 '13 at 18:01
    
You are right. What you are testing is the contract of the result of the promise, adn it's ok. What I'd do is fake timout, so the promise is not async and can be tested like any normal code. –  Kaizo Jul 25 '13 at 10:29
    
@Kaizo: Please see my second update in the question. –  thuld Jul 29 '13 at 10:31
    
@thuld I hope my update helps. –  Kaizo Jul 29 '13 at 13:17

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