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This is a C program with the recursive binary search algorithm, however when I run it, the debugger says there is an access segmentation fault in the binary search function. Why is this and how do I fix this?

Here is the recursive binary search function:

int binSearch(int val, int numbers[], int low, int high)                 
{
     int mid;

     mid=(low+high)/2;
     if(val==numbers[mid])
     {  
                return(mid);          
     }   
     else if(val<numbers[mid])
     {
                return(binSearch(val, numbers, low, mid-1));               
     }            
     else if(val>numbers[mid])
     { 
                return(binSearch(val, numbers, mid+1, high));  
     }    
     else if(low==high)
     {
                return(-1);    
     }
}

Thank you :)

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1  
Do you know where exactly it is seqfaulting? Can you try to move the last condition to the top of the function and see if it fixes it? –  Karthik T Jul 24 '13 at 9:40
    
How do you call the function? Where is the crash (at which line)? Can you please show the debugger backtrace? –  Joachim Pileborg Jul 24 '13 at 9:40
3  
You do not ensure that low is actually lower than hight. Add a test for that. –  mathk Jul 24 '13 at 9:42
    
@KarthikT Thanks so much, this made it work :) –  Michael Ferashire Silva Jul 24 '13 at 9:44
1  
@MichaelFerashireSilva Great! you are most welcome! –  Karthik T Jul 25 '13 at 2:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You must check low == high before val < ... and val > ... because otherwise high could become less than low and so your next recursion might calculate an invalid mid

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thanks very much :) –  Michael Ferashire Silva Jul 24 '13 at 9:46
    
what if low > high at the first place –  mathk Jul 24 '13 at 9:51
    
@mathk I would call that an invalid call to binSearch() so it should be enough to require low <= high in the function's doc. But of course you could check it first if you preferred. –  Ingo Leonhardt Jul 24 '13 at 10:15
    
this is basic security check. Never trust the input. –  mathk Jul 24 '13 at 13:48

Your edge cases are off: specifically, when your low and high indices pass, you continue to call recursively before you reach the low == high test. Rearrange the tests:

int binSearch(int val, int numbers[], int low, int high) {
    int mid = (low + high) / 2;

    if (val == numbers[mid]) return mid;

    if (val < numbers[mid]) {
        if (mid > low) return binSearch(val, numbers, low, mid-1);
    } else if (val > numbers[mid]) {
        if (mid < high) return binSearch(val, numbers, mid+1, high);
    }
    return -1;
}
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yes I realized that I was wrong :( –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 24 '13 at 10:08

Try this:

Fixed if constructs in your code

int binSearch(int val, int numbers[], int low, int high)                 
{
     int mid;

     mid=(low+high)/2;

     if(low<=high)
     {
         if(val==numbers[mid])
           return mid;          

         else if(val<numbers[mid])
           return binSearch(val, numbers, low, mid-1);

        else 
          return binSearch(val, numbers, mid+1, high);  
     }
     else
           return -1;    

}
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low < high is not ensure. If that is not the case your are going to search out of the array bound.

Add a sanity check for that.

if (low < high)
     return -1;

EDIT: as other point out you can also check if low == high at the beginning but that does not ensure that the first call of the function have sound value.

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