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I've recently tested the algorithm for reduction using CUDA (the one you can find for example at http://www.cuvilib.com/Reduction.pdf, page 16). But at the end of it, I ran into trouble not using atomicity. So basically I do the sum of each block and store it into shared array. Then I get it back to the global array x (tdx is threadIndex.x, and i is global index).

if(i==0){
        *sum = 0.; // Initialize to 0
    }
__syncthreads();
if (tdx == 0){       
    x[blockIdx.x] = s_x[tdx]; //get the shared sums in global memory
}
__syncthreads();

Then I want to sum the first x elements (as many as I have blocks). When doing with atomicity it works fine (same result as the cpu), however when I use the commented line below it does not work and often yields "nan":

if(i == 0){    
    for(int k = 0; k < gridDim.x; k++){
        atomicAdd(sum, x[k]); //Works good
       //sum[0] += x[k]; //or *sum += x[k]; //Does not work, often results in nan
    }
}

Now in fact I use atomicadd directly to sum the shared sums, but I would like to understand why this does not work. An atomic add is quite of nonsense when restricting the operation to a single thread. And the simple sum should work fine!

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__syncthreads() only synchronizes threads in the same block, not across different blocks. I think that the incorrect result is due to a synchronization problem. By the atomicAdd you are enforcing the synchronization between the different blocks you are missing by __syncthreads(). –  JackOLantern Jul 24 '13 at 9:54
    
Indeed when I add a __syncthreads() inside the for loop, the simple sum is working! But I don't get it. I'm doing the sum with only one single thread on a global array, so why should I care about syncing in the for loop? –  François Laenen Jul 24 '13 at 10:18
    
Ok I think I got it! The global array will not necessarily been written when entering the loop because all blocks won't have been synchronized. So what is the command for a "global" syncthread? –  François Laenen Jul 24 '13 at 10:23
    
The operands x[k] are the outcomes of the computations from different blocks: x[0] is the result from block 0, x[1] is the result from block 1, etc. I suspect that thread 0 could start adding them up before some blocks have really finished their computations. Try the following. Put the second code snippet in a different kernel, so that synchronization is enforced, and then try if the line sum[0] += x[k]; works. –  JackOLantern Jul 24 '13 at 10:24
    
Concerning your new question, CUDA has no safe synchronization mechanism across blocks. –  JackOLantern Jul 24 '13 at 10:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

__syncthreads() only synchronizes threads in the same block, not across different blocks and CUDA has no safe synchronization mechanism across blocks.

The incorrect result is due to a synchronization problem. The operands x[k] are the outcomes of the computations from different blocks: x[0] is the result from block 0, x[1] is the result from block 1, etc. Thread 0 could start adding them up before some blocks have really finished their computations.

You should put the second code snippet in a different kernel, so that synchronization is enforced, and the line sum[0] += x[k]; can now work.

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Note also that atomic is NOT a safe way to ensure syncing between blocks, especially as your number of blocks increase. When I try with 10^5 elements, 512 threads per bloc hence 196 blocks, I get the "nan" result. It just helps to slow down the summation processes, letting the time to the other threads from the other blocks to write their results, but this is definitely not a neat way to cope with it. Another kernel is better –  François Laenen Jul 24 '13 at 10:52
    
You are definitely right. I have revised my answer removing the sentence concerning atomicAdd. –  JackOLantern Jul 24 '13 at 11:08
    
A little add also: in fact, I searched for a solution without cutting my kernel in two, because the reduction will be used among other operations, in a device function. But there is neither syncing at the end of a device function. I found a nice way though, which is working with 10^5 elements: put a __threadfence() in the if block when retrieving shared memory into global memory, so that each thread 0 of each block will ensure that all threads are able to see its writing. And you can add smth more robust. In fact there is an example in the cuda prog. guide, section B5. –  François Laenen Jul 24 '13 at 14:15

As has been pointed out, your problem is due to missing synchronisation after the first pass since you cannot synchronise between blocks. There is a good walkthrough on reduction in the sample codes provided with the toolkit.

Having said that, I would strongly recommend that people don't write reduction kernels (or other primitives such as scan) where such primitives exist in library code. Much better to invest your effort elsewhere and reuse existing optimised code where it is available. This doesn't apply if you're doing this to learn of course!

I recommend you take a look at Thrust and CUB.

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