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I am trying to learn switch case php code. Here is the program that is working fine when using break.

for ($i=1;$i<=100;$i++) {
switch(true) {
        case ( $i%5 == 0  && $i%3 == 0 ):
            print 'foobar';
            break;
        case ( $i%3 == 0  ):
            print 'foo';
            break;
        case ( $i%5 == 0 ):
            print 'bar';
            break;
        case ( $i%5 != 0  && $i%3 != 0 ):
            print $i;
            break;
    } 
    echo '<br>';
}

But when I use the following code, it is giving me unexpected results:

for ($i=1;$i<100;$i++) {
switch(true) {
    case ( $i%3 == 0  ):
        print 'foo';
    case ( $i%5 == 0 ):
        print 'bar';
    default:
        print $i;
}
echo '<br>';
}

What is wrong in the second example?? Will default executes even when any above case is executed?? Also why $i%5 case is running for when $i equals to 3??

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because the first one uses break, and the second snippet doesn't.

If you don't add break, the code from the next case will also be executed, even if that condition isn't met.

That is just how switch works in PHP, and in a couple of other C-like languages as well. It differs from the (similar) case statement as you may know it from Pascal-like languages and SQL.

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so, it works like, if a case returns true, then all following cases will executes?? –  TheGodWings Jul 24 '13 at 10:53
    
Correct. So you need break to stop it from doing that. –  GolezTrol Jul 24 '13 at 10:54
    
thank you very much –  TheGodWings Jul 24 '13 at 10:55

In a PHP switch() statement, once a case has been met, every following line of code will be executed until either a break or the end of the block.

This allows for the intentional use of what's called a "fall through"

That is why your first example works and your second example did not do as you expected.

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