Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written a code in C# which is exceeding page width, so i want it to be broken into next line according to my formatting. I tried to search a lot to get that character for line break but was not able to find out.

In VB.NET I use '_' for line break, same way what is used in C# ? I am trying to break a string.

Thanks in Advance Shantanu Gupta

share|improve this question
2  
To break up a statement in C# over multiple lines, you need no special characters at all. A C# statement can be on as many lines as you wish and MUST end with a ; character. So the compiler keeps reading until it finds one. –  Eric Falsken Aug 25 '11 at 18:06

11 Answers 11

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Option A: concatenate several string literal into one:

string myText = "Looking up into the night sky is looking into infinity" +
    " - distance is incomprehensible and therefore meaningless.";

Option B: use a single multiline string literal:

string myText = @"Looking up into the night sky is looking into infinity
- distance is incomprehensible and therefore meaningless.";

With option B, the newline character(s) will be part of the string saved into variable myText. This might, or might not, be what you want.

share|improve this answer

In C# there's no 'new line' character like there is in VB.NET. The end of a logical 'line' of code is denoted by a ';'. If you wish to break the line of code over multiple lines, just hit the carriage return (or if you want to programmatically add it (for programmatically generated code) insert 'Environment.NewLine' or '\r\n'.

Edit: In response to your comment: If you wish to break a string over multiple lines (i.e. programmatically), you should insert the Environment.NewLine character. This will take the environment into account in order to create the line ending. For instance, many environments, including Unix/Linux only use a NewLine character (\n), but Windows uses both carriage return and line feed (\r\n). So to break a string you would use:

string output = "Hello this is my string\r\nthat I want broken over multiple lines."

Of course, this would only be good for Windows, so before I get flamed for incorrect practice you should actually do this:

string output = string.Format("Hello this is my string{0}that I want broken over multiple lines.", Environment.NewLine);

Or if you want to break over multiple lines in your IDE, you would do:

string output = "My string"
              + "is split over"
              + "multiple lines";
share|improve this answer
1  
Please add that multiline string literals can also be input using the @ character to force the compiler to honor in-string whitespace, linebreaks, and special characters. (double-quote and back-slash are the only ones needing to be escaped) –  Eric Falsken Aug 25 '11 at 18:03

Use @ symbol before starting the string. like

string s = @"this is a really
long string
and this is 
the rest of it";
share|improve this answer

If I am understanding this correctly, you should be able to break the string into substrings to accomplish this.

i.e.:

string s = "this is a really long string" +
"and this is the rest of it";
share|improve this answer

C# doesn't have an explicit line break character. You statements end with a semicolon so you can span your statements over many lines. These are both the same:

public string GenerateString()
{
	return "abc" + "def";
}

public string GenerateString()
{
	return
		"abc" +
		"def";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't fully answer the question. Quote: "I am trying to break a string." –  Mark Byers Nov 23 '09 at 14:20
    
Good point, fixed. –  Jake Pearson Nov 23 '09 at 14:24
2  
Use Environment.NewLine in C#! –  Dave Apr 13 '12 at 16:02
 result = "Minimum MarketData"+ Environment.NewLine
           + "Refresh interval is 1";
share|improve this answer
    
Works perfectly! Thanks. –  Baxter Jul 30 '13 at 13:45

C# code can be split between lines on pretty much any syntatic construct without a need for a '_' style construct.

For example

foo.
 Bar(
   42
 , "again");
share|improve this answer
   dt = abj.getDataTable(
"select bookrecord.userid,usermaster.userName, "
                                                +" book.bookname,bookrecord.fromdate, "
                                                +" bookrecord.todate,bookrecord.bookstatus "
                                                +" from book,bookrecord,usermaster " 
                                                +" where bookrecord.bookid='"+ bookId +"' "
                                                +" and usermaster.userId=bookrecord.userid "
                                                +" and book.bookid='"+ bookId +"'");
share|improve this answer

All you need to do is add \n or to write on files go \r\n.

Examples // say you wanted to right duck(line break) cow this is how you would do it Console.WriteLine("duck\n cow");

share|improve this answer

guys.. use resources for long strings in code behind!!

also.. you don't need an _ for codeline breaks in C#. In VB the codelines end with a newline character (or a ':'), using the the _ would tell the parser it has not reached the end of the line yet. The codeline in C# ends with a ';' so you can use newlines to styleformat your code.

share|improve this answer

Strings are immutable, so using

public string GenerateString()
{
    return
        "abc" +
        "def";
}

will slow you performance - each of those values is a string literal which must be concatenated at runtime - bad news if you reuse the method/property/whatever alot...

Store your string literals in resources is a good idea...

public string GenerateString()
{
    return Resources.MyString;
}

That way it is localisable and the code is tidy (although performance is pretty terrible).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.