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Since multiple inheritance is bad (it makes the source more complicated) C# does not provide such a pattern directly. But sometimes it would be helpful to have this ability.

For instance I'm able to implement the missing multiple inheritance pattern using interfaces and three classes like that:

public interface IFirst { void FirstMethod(); }
public interface ISecond { void SecondMethod(); }

public class First:IFirst 
{ 
    public void FirstMethod() { Console.WriteLine("First"); } 
}

public class Second:ISecond 
{ 
    public void SecondMethod() { Console.WriteLine("Second"); } 
}

public class FirstAndSecond: IFirst, ISecond
{
    First first = new First();
    Second second = new Second();
    public void FirstMethod() { first.FirstMethod(); }
    public void SecondMethod() { second.SecondMethod(); }
}

Every time I add a method to one of the interfaces I need to change the class FirstAndSecond as well.

Is there a way to inject multiple existing classes into one new class like it is possible in C++?

Maybe there is a solution using some kind of code generation?

Or it may look like this (imaginary c# syntax):

public class FirstAndSecond: IFirst from First, ISecond from Second
{ }

So that there won't be a need to update the class FirstAndSecond when I modify one of the interfaces.


EDIT

Maybe it would be better to consider a practical example:

You have an existing class (e.g. a text based TCP client based on ITextTcpClient) which you do already use at different locations inside your project. Now you feel the need to create a component of your class to be easy accessible for windows forms developers.

As far as I know you currently have two ways to do this:

  1. Write a new class that is inherited from components and implements the interface of the TextTcpClient class using an instance of the class itself as shown with FirstAndSecond.

  2. Write a new class that inherits from TextTcpClient and somehow implements IComponent (haven't actually tried this yet).

In both cases you need to do work per method and not per class. Since you know that we will need all the methods of TextTcpClient and Component it would be the easiest solution to just combine those two into one class.

To avoid conflicts this may be done by code generation where the result could be altered afterwards but typing this by hand is a pure pain in the ass.

share|improve this question
    
To the extent that this is not simply multiple inheritance in disguise, how is it less complicated? –  harpo Oct 7 '08 at 13:08
    
Thinking about the new extension methods in 3.5 and the way it works (static member call generation), this might be one of the next .NET language evolution. –  Larry Oct 7 '08 at 13:12
    
Sometimes I wonder why people don't just do... class A: class B: class C ? –  Chibueze Opata Apr 25 '12 at 1:38
    
@NazarMerza: Link has changed. Now: The Problem with Multiple Inheritance. –  Craig McQueen Sep 11 '13 at 5:20
    
Don't let propaganda fool you. Your very example shows that multiple inheritance is useful and interfaces is just a workaround for the lack of it –  Kemal Erdogan Sep 29 '13 at 16:00

13 Answers 13

up vote 43 down vote accepted

Since multiple inheritance is bad (it makes the source more complicated) C# does not provide such a pattern directly. But sometimes it would be helpful to have this ability.

C# and the .net CLR have not implemented MI because they have not concluded how it would inter-operate between C#, VB.net and the other languages yet, not because "it would make source more complex"

MI is a useful concept, the un-answered questions are ones like:- "What do you do when you have multiple common base classes in the different superclasses?

Perl is the only language I've ever worked with where MI works and works well. .Net may well introduce it one day but not yet, the CLR does already support MI but as I've said, there are no language constructs for it beyond that yet.

Until then you are stuck with Proxy objects and multiple Interfaces instead :(

share|improve this answer
23  
The CLR doesn't support multiple implementation inheritance, only multiple interface inheritance (which is also supported in C#). –  Jordão Jul 26 '10 at 2:05
3  
@Jordão: For completeness sake: it is possible for compilers to create MI for their types in the CLR. It does have it's caveats, it isn't CLS compliant for example. For more information see this (2004) article blogs.msdn.com/b/csharpfaq/archive/2004/03/07/… –  dvdvorle Mar 1 '12 at 8:45
    
Turns out you can also do python's MI using IronPython –  IanNorton Mar 1 '12 at 20:21
2  
@MrHappy: Very interesting article. I've actually investigated some way of Trait Composition for C#, take a look. –  Jordão Mar 3 '12 at 3:32
7  
@MandeepJanjua I did not claim any such thing, I said 'may well introduce it' The fact remains that the ECMA standard CLR does provide the IL machinery for multiple inheritence, just that nothing makes use of it fully. –  IanNorton May 8 '12 at 21:44

Consider just using composition instead of trying to simulate Multiple Inheritance. You can use Interfaces to define what classes make up the composition, eg: ISteerable implies a property of type SteeringWheel, IBrakable implies a property of type BrakePedal, etc.

Once you've done that, you could use the Extension Methods feature added to C# 3.0 to further simplify calling methods on those implied properties, eg:

public interface ISteerable { SteeringWheel wheel { get; set; } }

public interface IBrakable { BrakePedal brake { get; set; } }

public class Vehicle : ISteerable, IBrakable
{
    public SteeringWheel wheel { get; set; }

    public BrakePedal brake { get; set; }

    public Vehicle() { wheel = new SteeringWheel(); brake = new BrakePedal(); }
}

public static class SteeringExtensions
{
    public static void SteerLeft(this ISteerable vehicle)
    {
        vehicle.wheel.SteerLeft();
    }
}

public static class BrakeExtensions
{
    public static void Stop(this IBrakable vehicle)
    {
        vehicle.brake.ApplyUntilStop();
    }
}


public class Main
{
    Vehicle myCar = new Vehicle();

    public void main()
    {
        myCar.SteerLeft();
        myCar.Stop();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
9  
That's the point though - an idea like this would ease composition. –  Jon Skeet Oct 7 '08 at 13:15
2  
Very nice explanation. Thank you! –  spoulson Oct 7 '08 at 13:50
5  
Yes, but there are use cases where you really need the methods as part of the main object –  David Pierre Oct 7 '08 at 14:34
5  
Unfortunately member variable data is not accessible in extension methods so you have to expose them as internal or (ug) public, though I think composition by contract is the best way to solve multiple inheritance. –  cfeduke Oct 10 '08 at 10:52
3  
Excellent answer! Concise, easy to understand, very useful illustration. Thank you! –  AJ. Oct 20 '08 at 20:11

I created a C# post-compiler that enables this kind of thing:

using NRoles;

public interface IFirst { void FirstMethod(); }
public interface ISecond { void SecondMethod(); }

public class RFirst : IFirst, Role {
  public void FirstMethod() { Console.WriteLine("First"); }
}

public class RSecond : ISecond, Role {
  public void SecondMethod() { Console.WriteLine("Second"); }
}

public class FirstAndSecond : Does<RFirst>, Does<RSecond> { }

You can run the post-compiler as a Visual Studio post-build-event:

C:\some_path\nroles-v0.1.0-bin\nutate.exe "$(TargetPath)"

In the same assembly you use it like this:

var fas = new FirstAndSecond();
fas.As<RFirst>().FirstMethod();
fas.As<RSecond>().SecondMethod();

In another assembly you use it like this:

var fas = new FirstAndSecond();
fas.FirstMethod();
fas.SecondMethod();
share|improve this answer

I'd like this too - it's what I personally refer to as a mix-in, although I realise it's an overloaded term. I'd like to be able to specify the variable used to implement the interface, with the option to provide my own implementation for specific methods.

I've blogged about this in more detail - although in the context of a deliberate overstatement of what it could mean in terms of inheritance.

I see no reason why this couldn't be implemented in the C# compiler - but it's another bit of language complexity...

share|improve this answer
    
Due to just the additional complexity for any feature, or because this particular feature is bad? –  Jon Skeet Oct 7 '08 at 13:20
21  
Mitch Wheat, then why add Extension Methods or LINQ or any other new feature? If you don't need it, don't use it. To not provide a tool because some would find it too complex is a joke. –  Josh Smeaton Nov 8 '09 at 8:29
    
@JoshSmeaton - I realise this is many years old, but... What is your opinion on the removal of pointer arithmetic and explicit memory allocations and de-allocations? Should that be reversed and thereby re-instate a useful tool? –  MatBailie Jul 11 '13 at 16:50
2  
@MatBailie, I have no opinion on either of those since I have never used them in c# and don't know the reasoning behind removing those features. I guess it comes down to cost and complexity - is the feature useful outside a narrow target userbase? Does the feature "fit in" with the way the language is defined and used? Does the feature confuse a lot of people? My original argument was not to add all the features - but to dismiss one for being "scary" alone is invalid IMO. –  Josh Smeaton Jul 11 '13 at 22:23
    
@MatBailie you can't really say not having pointer arithmetic or explicit memory allocation/deallocation is a removal of a feature. C# just works differently. (Plus, unsafe code and a few other language features allows you to do some of this in c#) –  David Sherret Sep 10 '13 at 15:16

Multiple inheritance is one of those things that generally causes more problems than it solves. In C++ it fits the pattern of giving you enough rope to hang yourself, but Java and C# have chosen to go the safer route of not giving you the option. The biggest problem is what to do if you inherit multiple classes that have a method with the same signature that the inheritee doesn't implement. Which class's method should it choose? Or should that not compile? There is generally another way to implement most things that doesn't rely on multiple inheritance.

share|improve this answer
5  
Please don't judge MI by C++, that's like judging OOP by PHP or automobiles by Pintos. That problem is easily solvable: in Eiffel, when you inherit from a class, you also have to specify which methods you want to inherit and you can rename them. No ambiguities there and no suprises either. –  Jörg W Mittag Dec 13 '08 at 12:44
    
@Jorg Sounds like Eiffel is actually doing a mixin... –  mP. Jul 7 '10 at 11:40
1  
@mP: no, Eiffel provides true multiple implementation inheritance. Renaming doesn't mean loosing the inheritance chain, nor will it loose the castability of classes. –  Abel Jul 19 '10 at 15:33
    
@tloach - off topic –  Micky Duncan Nov 29 '11 at 9:36

You could have one abstract base class that implements both IFirst and ISecond, and then inherit from just that base.

share|improve this answer
    
This is probably the best solution, but not necessarily the best idea :p –  leppie Oct 7 '08 at 13:10
    
wouldn't you still have to edit the abstract class when you add methods to the interafces? –  Rik Oct 7 '08 at 13:27
    
Rik: just how lazy are you, when you only have to do this once? –  leppie Oct 7 '08 at 13:43
    
@leppie - "Every time I add a method to one of the interfaces I need to change the class FirstAndSecond as well." This part of the original question isn't addressed by this solution, is it? –  Rik Oct 7 '08 at 14:00
1  
You would have to edit the abstract class, but you NOT have to edit any other classes that depend on it. The buck stops there, rather than continuing to cascade to the entire collection of classes. –  Joel Coehoorn Oct 7 '08 at 14:57

Oddly enough, I figured out how to do something similar to this here.

share|improve this answer

If you can live with the restriction that the methods of IFirst and ISecond must only interact with the contract of IFirst and ISecond (like in your example)... you can do what you ask with extension methods. In practice, this is rarely the case.

public interface IFirst {}
public interface ISecond {}

public class FirstAndSecond : IFirst, ISecond
{
}

public static MultipleInheritenceExtensions
{
  public static void First(this IFirst theFirst)
  {
    Console.WriteLine("First");
  }

  public static void Second(this ISecond theSecond)
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Second");
  }
}

///

public void Test()
{
  FirstAndSecond fas = new FirstAndSecond();
  fas.First();
  fas.Second();
}

So the basic idea is that you define the required implementation in the interfaces... this required stuff should support the flexible implementation in the extension methods. Anytime you need to "add methods to the interface" instead you add an extension method.

share|improve this answer

MI is NOT bad, everybody that has (seriously) used it LOVES it and it doesNOT complicate the code! At least not anymore than other constructs may complicate the code. Bad code is bad code regardless of whether or not MI is in the picture.

Anyway, I've got a nice little solution for Multiple Inheritance I wanted to share, it's at; http://ra-ajax.org/lsp-liskov-substitution-principle-to-be-or-not-to-be.blog or you can follow the link in my sig... :)

share|improve this answer
    
Is it possible to have multiple inheritance and while having upcasts and downcasts be identity-preserving? The solutions I know of for the problems of multiple inheritance revolve around having casts that are not identity-preserving (if myFoo is of type Foo, which inherits from Moo and Goo, both of which inherit from Boo, then (Boo)(Moo)myFoo and (Boo)(Goo)myFoo would not be equivalent). Are you aware of any identity-preserving approaches? –  supercat Apr 4 '13 at 22:34
    
There is a problem with the link provided... –  Francis Rodgers Oct 30 at 11:14

i know i know even though its not allowed and so on, sometime u actualy need it so for the those:

class a {}
class b : a {}
class c : b {}

like in my case i wanted to do this class b : Form (yep the windows.forms) class c : b {}

cause half of the function were identical and with interface u must rewrite them all

share|improve this answer
    
Your example doesn't depict multiple inheritance, so what problem are you trying to solve? A true multiple inheritance example would show class a : b, c (implementing any necessary contract holes). Perhaps your examples are just over simplified? –  M.Babcock Jan 24 '13 at 5:27

Not sure I understand your question well enough to answer but take a look at this article.

share|improve this answer

If X inherits from Y, that has two somewhat orthogonal effects:

  1. Y will provide default functionality for X, so the code for X only has to include stuff which is different from Y.
  2. Almost anyplace a Y would be expected, an X may be used instead.

Although inheritance provides for both features, it is not hard to imagine circumstances where either could be of use without the other. No .net language I know of has a direct way of implementing the first without the second, though one could obtain such functionality by defining a base class which is never used directly, and having one or more classes that inherit directly from it without adding anything new (such classes could share all their code, but would not be substitutable for each other). Any CLR-compliant language, however, will allow the use of interfaces which provide the second feature of interfaces (substitutability) without the first (member reuse).

share|improve this answer

Yes using Interface is a hassle because anytime we add a method in the class we have to add the signature in the interface. Also, what if we already have a class with a bunch of methods but no Interface for it? we have to manually create Interface for all the classes that we want to inherit from. And the worst thing is, we have to implement all methods in the Interfaces in the child class if the child class is to inherit from the multiple interface.

I like to inherit from multiple classes using accessor. Declare the classes as properties with {get;set;} inside the class that need to inherit and all public properties and methods are from that class, and in the constructor of the child class instantiate the parent classes.

For example:

 namespace OOP
 {
     class Program
     {
         static void Main(string[] args)
         {
             Child somechild = new Child();
             somechild.doHomeWork();
             somechild.myFather.work();
             somechild.myMother.cook();
             Console.ReadLine();
         }
     }

     public class Father 
     {
         public Father() { }
         public void work()
         {
             Console.WriteLine("working...");
         }
         public void nap()
         {
             Console.WriteLine("napping...");
         }
     }


     public class Mother 
     {
         public Mother() { }
         public void cook()
         {
             Console.WriteLine("cooking...");
         }
         public void clean()
         {
             Console.WriteLine("cleaning...");
         }
     }


     public class Child 
     {
         public Father myFather { get; set; }
         public Mother myMother { get; set; }

         public Child()
         {
             myFather = new Father();
             myMother = new Mother();
         }

         public void goToSchool()
         {
             Console.WriteLine("go to school...");
         }
         public void doHomeWork()
         {
             Console.WriteLine("doing homework...");
         }
     }


 }

with this structure class Child will have access to all methods and properties of Class Father and Mother, simulating multiple inheritance, inheriting an instance of the parent classes. Not quite the same but it is practical.

share|improve this answer
    
I disagree with the first paragraph. You only add the signatures of the methods you want in EVERY class to the interface. But you can add as many additional methods to any classes as you want. Also, there is a right click, extract interface which makes the job of extracting interfaces simple. Finally, your example is not in any way inheritance (multiple or otherwise), it is however a great example of composition. Alas, it would have more merit had you used interfaces to also demonstrate DI/IOC using constructor / property injection. While I wont vote down I don't think its a good answer sorry. –  Francis Rodgers Dec 17 at 19:25

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