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I've got a three col table. It has a unique index, and another two (for two different columnts) for faster queries.

+-------------+-------------+----------+
| category_id | related_id  | position |
+-------------+-------------+----------+

Sometimes the query is

SELECT * FROM table WHERE category_id = foo

and sometimes it's

SELECT * FROM table WHERE related_id = foo

So I decided to make both category_id and related_id an index for better performance. Is this bad practice? What are the downsides of this approach?

In the case I already have 100.000 rows in that table, and am inserting another 100.000, will it be an overkill. having to refresh the index with every new insert? Would that operation then take too long? Thanks

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you mean you made EACH one an index? then good. downside is that you have to maintain that index at insert or update time. usually not too much overhead at all. –  Randy Jul 24 '13 at 11:57
    
yes, each one. So, in the case I already have 100.000 rows in that table, and am inserting another 100.000, will that be an overkill, having to refresh the index with every new insert? Would that operation then take too long? –  Netismine Jul 24 '13 at 11:59
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Its good to have indexes. Just understand that indexes would take more disk space, but faster search.

It is in your best interest to index those fields which have less repeated values. For eg. Indexing a field that contains a Boolean flag might not be a good idea.

Since in your case you are having an id, hence I think you won't be having any problem in keeping the indexes that you have created.

Also, the inserts would be slower, but since you are saving id's there won't be much of a difference in the time required to insert. Go ahead and do the insert.

My personal advice : When you are inserting large number of rows in a single table in one go, don't insert them using a single query, unless mandatory. This would prevent your table from getting locked and inaccessible for a long time.

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thanks - can you please answer the additional question I added to the bottom ? –  Netismine Jul 24 '13 at 12:03
    
Updated the answer. –  Manu Jul 24 '13 at 12:11
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There are no downsides if it's doing exactly what you want, you query on a specific column a lot, so you make that column indexed, that's the whole point. Now you have a 60 column table and your adding indexes to columns you never query on then you are wasting resources because those indexes need to be maintained on INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE operations.

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thanks - can you please answer the additional question I added to the bottom ? –  Netismine Jul 24 '13 at 12:04
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If you have created index for each column then you will definitely get benefit out of it.

Don't go for composite indexes (Multiple coulmn indexes).

You yourself can see the advantage of index in your query by using EXPLAIN (statement provides information about how MySQL executes statements).

EXAMPLE:

EXPLAIN  SELECT * FROM table WHERE category_id = foo;

Hope this will help.

~K

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