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#child.pm

#!/usr/bin/perl
package child1;
use strict;
use warnings;
use Exporter;
use parent;
my @ISA=qw(cal Exporter);
sub new{
        my $class=shift;
        my $ref=cal->new();
        bless ($ref,$class);
        return $ref;
        }
sub add{
        my $ref=shift;
        print "This is from child class";
        my($a,$b)=@_;
        return ($a+$b); 
        }

##parent.pm

#!/usr/bin/perl
package cal;
use strict;
use warnings;
use Exporter;
my @EXPORT=qw(add);
my @ISA=qw(Exporter EXPORT);
sub new{
        my $class=shift;
        my $ref=[];
        bless ($ref,$class);
        return $ref;
        }

sub add{
        my $ref=shift;
        my $a=shift;
        my $b=shift;
        return ($a+$b);
        }
1;

#test.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Exporter;
use child;
my @ISA=qw(child1 Exporter);
my $obj=new child1();
my $sum=$obj->add(1,2);
print "$sum=sum";

I am getting the error Can't locate object method "add" via package "child1" at ./test.pl line 8. I want to access the base class add method and I am getting this above error

please clarify..

share|improve this question
    
Where did you see that syntax? Are you working with a book or tutorial? To be frank, your code looks like it's 1998. –  innaM Jul 24 '13 at 14:28
    
@innaM which syntax u r saying?..i am a beginner. –  user2560452 Jul 25 '13 at 6:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The .pm modules do not need, and likely do not want, the #!/usr/bin/perl lines. This is only for programs intended to be executed from the command line, like your .pl module. While you may 'perl -cw' your .pm modules, or do other command line debugging with them, such is not normal "production" use.

And .pl modules should not have @ISA, or other "our" declarations found in packages nor any exporter related things.

As said before, change "my"s for package stuff to "our"s. The "my" hides things as if the statements were never there.

In the "cal" class, do you want something like the following? I favor SUPER as it really shows what is going on and is much more generic.

package child1;
use Exporter;
our @ISA=qw(cal Exporter);

sub new{
        my $class=shift;
        my $ref=$class->SUPER::new();
        return $ref;
        }
}

One final point: you may need a "\n" on the final print statement. Without it the buffer may not flush correctly on exit in some environments so you will never see the output.

share|improve this answer
    
is there any syntax other than cal->add(1,2) in the test file for accessing the base class add function....if any please tell me..thanks –  user2560452 Jul 25 '13 at 5:45
    
The SUPER shown in my code. It lets perl hunt for the right class through the @ISA. –  Gilbert Jul 26 '13 at 12:08

The main culprit here is my @ISA. For inheritance to work, you have to use the package @ISA (declare it with our).

However, there are some issues in your code beyond that:

  1. Please use parent 'cal' instead of manipulating @ISA yourself.
  2. Object-oriented modules have little reason to use Exporter.
  3. The child1's new can be written without reblessing, because the parent's new is inherited. The inherited new is written in a way that already supports inheritance.
  4. Don't give your modules lower-case names, these are reserved for “pragmas”. The parent module already exists, and I used it in my 1st point.
share|improve this answer

@ISA must be a public package variable, not a private lexical (my). Same for @EXPORT. Change my to our on all those declarations.

Even better, depending on the version of perl you have, simplify you life with either the parent or base pragma to load superclasses and to set up the class relationships.

With respect to style, you will avoid considerable confusion if you make the paths to the files that contains your modules’ code match their package names. You would do well to heed a well-established convention described in the perlmod documentation.

Module names are also capitalized unless they're functioning as pragmas; pragmas are in effect compiler directives, and are sometimes called “pragmatic modules” (or even “pragmata” if you're a classicist).

The Cal module uses an internal _initialize method as described in the perlobj documentation to facilitate inheritance of the constructor.

See below for a complete working example.

Cal.pm

package Cal;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub new {
  my $class=shift;
  my $self=[];
  bless ($self,$class);
  $self->_initialize();
  return $self;
}

sub _initialize {}

sub add {
  my $ref=shift;
  my $a=shift;
  my $b=shift;
  print "This is from parent class\n";
  return ($a+$b);
}

1;

Child1.pm

package Child1;

use warnings;
use strict;

use v5.10.1;  # when parent was added to the core
use parent "Cal";

# if you have an older perl, use base instead of parent
# use base "Cal";

sub _initialize {
  my $self=shift;
  push @$self, "I am a " . ref($self) . "!";
}

sub add{
  my $self=shift;
  my($a,$b)=@_;
  print "This is from child class\n";
  return ($a+$b);
}

1;

test.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Child1;

my $obj=Child1->new();

my $sum1=$obj->add(1,2);
print "$sum1=sum1\n";

# call the add method in Cal
my $sum2=$obj->Cal::add(1,2);
print "$sum2=sum2\n";

# call add as a class method of Cal, which
# happens to work in this case because Cal::add
# does not use the instance passed to it
my $sum3=Cal->add(1,2);
print "$sum3=sum3\n";

Output:

This is from child class
3=sum1
This is from parent class
3=sum2
This is from parent class
3=sum3
share|improve this answer
2  
base is superseded by parent. The difference between the two pragmata is that parent will always require the requested module, and that base is meant to be used with the outdated fields pragma. –  amon Jul 24 '13 at 12:09
    
@amon But parent is not available on RedHat Linux Enterprise, which is still at v5.8.8, and probably will be for almost ever. So you’d have to add it yourself. However, you really should. –  tchrist Jul 24 '13 at 14:34
    
@amon Thanks! Updated. –  Greg Bacon Jul 24 '13 at 15:54
    
@tchrist Thanks! Updated. –  Greg Bacon Jul 24 '13 at 15:55
    
is there any syntax other than cal->add(1,2) in the test file for accessing the base class add function....if any please tell me..thanks – –  user2560452 Jul 25 '13 at 5:54

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