Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a MongoDB datastore set up with location data stored like this:

{
"_id" : ObjectId("51d3e161ce87bb000792dc8d"),
"datetime_recorded" : ISODate("2013-07-03T05:35:13Z"),
"loc" : {
    "coordinates" : [
        0.297716,
        18.050614
    ],
    "type" : "Point"
},
"vid" : "11111-22222-33333-44444"
}

I'd like to be able to perform a query similar to the date range example but instead on a time range. i.e. Retrieve all points recorded between 12AM and 4PM (can be done with 1200 and 1600 24 hour time as well).

e.g.

With points:

  • "datetime_recorded" : ISODate("2013-05-01T12:35:13Z"),
  • "datetime_recorded" : ISODate("2013-06-20T05:35:13Z"),
  • "datetime_recorded" : ISODate("2013-01-17T07:35:13Z"),
  • "datetime_recorded" : ISODate("2013-04-03T15:35:13Z"),

a query

db.points.find({'datetime_recorded': {
    $gte: Date(1200 hours),
    $lt: Date(1600 hours)}
});

would yield only the first and last point.

Is this possible? Or would I have to do it for every day?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
As Mongodb doesn't have date/time operators for normal queries, I'd definitely recommend changing your schema to include time as a distinct field. Without it, you'll not be able to use an index efficiently to narrow the results. –  WiredPrairie Jul 24 '13 at 15:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, the best way to solve this is to store the minutes separately as well. But you can get around this with the aggregation framework, although that is not going to be very fast:

db.so.aggregate( [ 
    { $project: {
        loc: 1,
        vid: 1,
        datetime_recorded: 1, 
        minutes: { $add: [
            { $multiply: [ { $hour: '$datetime_recorded' }, 60 ] }, 
            { $minute: '$datetime_recorded' } 
        ] } 
    } },
    { $match: { 'minutes' : { $gte : 12 * 60, $lt : 16 * 60 } } }
] );

In the first step $project, we calculate the minutes from hour * 60 + min which we then match against in the second step: $match.

share|improve this answer
    
you're right - not fast! but it does the job :-) Upvoted but just going to see if anyone can provide a faster way of doing it. Thanks a lot! Might right a little pymongo script to loop update each one with an hour/minutes separately... –  Ewan Jul 24 '13 at 13:17
    
Answer accepted - Working for now on small datasets whilst I get a minutes/hours field added. Thanks a lot @Derick –  Ewan Jul 25 '13 at 9:57
2  
yuk, how can this be the best solution in mongoDB? querying by time range shouldn't be rocket time –  GreyCloud Mar 27 '14 at 9:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.