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In a C++ class declaration:

class Thing
{
    ...
};

why must I include the semicolon?

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3  
Come on! Thats a really silly question. –  jkp Nov 23 '09 at 14:33
1  
Because if you don't, your program won't compile. End of story. –  Charles Salvia Nov 23 '09 at 18:10
11  
Those are hardly answers, guys. –  GManNickG Nov 23 '09 at 18:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 68 down vote accepted

The full syntax is, essentially,

class NAME { constituents } instances ;

where constituent-sequence is the sequence of class elements and methods, and instance-sequence is a comma-separated list of instances of the class.

Example:

class FOO {
  int bar;
  int baz;
} waldo;

declares both the class FOO and an object waldo.

The instance sequence may be empty, in which case you would have just

class FOO {
  int bar;
  int baz;
};

You have to put the semicolon there so the compiler will know whether you declared any instances or not.

This is a C compatibility thing.

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10  
Doesn't even need the name or constituents: class { } waldo; is legal. –  MSalters Nov 23 '09 at 15:05
6  
+1 I learned something new. –  StackedCrooked Nov 23 '09 at 16:05

Because the language grammar says so...

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1  
You are gonna get your first nice answer badge for this... :) –  Amarghosh Nov 23 '09 at 14:42
    
comon vote for this answer like crazy –  Pieter888 Nov 23 '09 at 15:41
16  
why is this voted up? Why is the sky blue? ... because it's not red, duh! Seriously vote this down. –  deft_code Nov 23 '09 at 17:45
1  
Great analogy, Caspin. Not sure why so many people think this is useful. Next time you upvoters wonder why something is the way it is, just repeat the question as your answer and there you go! –  GManNickG Nov 23 '09 at 18:43
7  
Look at John's answer to see what a useful answer to this question looks like. –  sepp2k Nov 23 '09 at 23:14

because you can optionally declare objects

class Thing
{
    ...
}instanceOfThing;

for historical reasons

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1  
+1 For saying historical reasons instead of backwards compability. This feauture is only here to please the oldies! –  David Kron Feb 16 '13 at 7:59

Because it could be a definition of the next element. For example, taking it from C syntax: if you declare

struct { ... } main (int argc, char..

then it assumes main returns a struct. If there was a semicolon,

struct { ... }; main (int argc, char..

then main returns an int.

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6  
C++ language has no "implicit int" rule. Your second variant is simply incorrect. –  AndreyT Nov 23 '09 at 14:43

A good rule to help you remember where to put semicolons:

  • If it's a definition, it needs a semicolon at the end. Classes, structs and unions are all information for the compiler, so need a trailing ; to mark no declared instances.
  • If it contains code, it doesn't need a semicolon at the end. If statements, for loops, while loops and functions contain code, so don't need a trailing ;.

Namespaces also don't require a trailing semicolon, because they can contain a mix of both the above (so can contain code, so don't need a semicolon).

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