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I'm trying to work my way into programming with C. One huge and in my opinion important step is to get to know working with raw blocks of memory, initialize them and free them. In the test programm at hand I created two structs that each have a pointer.

struct Address {
    int id;
    int var;
    char *name;
};

struct Link {
    int link_var;
    struct Address *addr;
};

name and addr are pointers in this case, because I want them to be dynamically sized.

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{    
    FILE *file = fopen("test.dat", "w");
    int i = 0;

    struct Link *link = malloc(sizeof(struct Link) + (sizeof(struct Address)*10) + (10*10));

    struct Address addr_container[10];

    for(i = 0; i < 10; i++) {

        char temp_name[10];
        memset(temp_name, '\0', 10);

        temp_name[0] = 'A';

        struct Address addr_proto = {.id = i, .var = 10, .name = temp_name};

        addr_container[i] = addr_proto;
    }

    struct Link link_proto = {.link_var = 2, .addr = addr_container};

    memcpy(link, &link_proto, sizeof(struct Link) + (sizeof(struct Address)*10) + (10*10));

    printf("%s\n", link->addr[4].name);



    int rc = fwrite(link, sizeof(struct Link) + (sizeof(struct Address)*10) + (10*10), 1, file);
    if(rc != 1) printf("Failed to write database.");

    fclose(file);
    free(link);

    return 0;
}

So the way I chose here, was to allocate all the memory needed to *link. After that I created a Prototype of a Link structure that has all the data initialized. (Also the pointers within the structs are pointing to initialized values)

After that I copy all the Data from the Prototype in the Stack memory to a raw memory block on the heap. with memcpy.

When I write the link to a file Valgrind yells at me that I want to write uninitialized bytes.

Is it because I need to allocate memory for all the pointers within the structures individually? I don't understand how I write a file that contains all the links that I want and the data.. So I could read it and reapply to a new empty link structure.

I'm pretty new in C and this is an early attempt to learn about memory allocation so I'm happy for every answer that criticizes my code. I also did search for answers on stackoverflow and I found answers about the need to allocate Memory for pointers in structs specifically. But I couldn't figure out how to implement it in the code. Also I read about making a loop that writes the code to a file in the structure and with the links I need. Is that the most efficient and single way?

By the way: I need to use pointers because in the end I want those pointers to make different sizes for chars and Address struct arrays possible.

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1  
In your struct Address, the id field may very well break, because id is a reserved keyword in Objective-C, that's defined to void *, IIRC. But what you're trying to do seems like pure C. –  Cyrille Jul 24 '13 at 13:02
1  
That is all C. There is no Objective-C in that question. –  David Rönnqvist Jul 24 '13 at 13:03
1  
So where does Objective-C come into this? It looks like plain C to me. –  PartiallyFinite Jul 24 '13 at 13:03
    
It is plain C. thanks for editing. :) –  Jan Jul 24 '13 at 13:13

3 Answers 3

To "externalize" a memory object/data structure, e.g. when sending an object over a network to another process or writing to a file, one needs to format or convert the memory object into a portable representation. Pointers only have meaning within a context of a process.

One usually ends up encoding a memory object into a portable buffer when sending or writing and decoding a portable buffer into a memory object when receiving or reading.

Almost all unix/linux/bsd systems have External Data Representation, XDR, library routines as part of libc. Do 'man xdr' for more info.

xdr is well suited if you are working with C language.

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What you are trying to achieve is serialization or marshalling and is commonly done when sending data across a network connection, which has the added complexity of needing to be cross-platform in many cases.

These days I think you should consider using Google Protocol Buffers to achieve this, as it will do most of the heavy lifting for you.

An iOS or OSX-specific solution could also be Core Data.

Fundamentally those pointers are meaningless within the file and are relevant only to your process during a single invocation.

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you can try this code:

 #include "stdio.h"

    struct Address {
        int id;
        int var;
        char *name;
    };

    struct Link {
        int link_var;
        struct Address *addr;
    };

    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        FILE *file = fopen("test.dat", "w");
        int i = 0;

        //struct Link *link = malloc(sizeof(struct Link) + (sizeof(struct Address)*10) + (10*10));//B2 + 10B1 +100
        struct Link *link = malloc(sizeof(struct Link));
        struct Address addr_container[10];

        for(i = 0; i < 10; i++) {

            char temp_name[10];
            memset(temp_name, '\0', 10);

            temp_name[0] = 'A';

            struct Address addr_proto = {.id = i, .var = 10, .name = temp_name};

            addr_container[i] = addr_proto;
        }

        struct Link link_proto = {.link_var = 2, .addr = addr_container};

        memcpy(link, &link_proto,sizeof(struct Link));// sizeof(struct Link) + (sizeof(struct Address)*10) + (10*10));

        printf("%s\n", link->addr[4].name);

        fprintf(file,"link_var : %d\n",(link->link_var));
        for(i = 0; i< 10; ++i)
        {
             fprintf(file,"Adress id is      :%d\n",(link->addr[i].id));
             fprintf(file,"Adress var is     :%d\n",(link->addr[i].var));
             fprintf(file,"Adress name is    :%s\n\n",(link->addr[i].name));
        }
        fclose(file);
        free(link);

        return 0;
    }

The fwrite() write in binary,and the memory of all data is not continuous!

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