Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having some issues with a java calculator assignment I was handed. I was told to make a calculator that does very basic functions, catches exceptions and allows you to correct values for either operand or operator immediately (which is what I'm having problems with). For instance, this is what should happen in the console:

j * 6
Catch exception and print error message here and asking for new first operand
4
Answer: 4 * 6 = 24

or

8 h 9
Catch exception and print error message here asking for new operator
+
Answer: 8 + 9 = 17

This code is what I have so far:

import java.util.*;
public class Calculator{

static int _state = 3;

public static void main(String[] args){

_state = 3;

System.out.println("Usage: operand1 operator operand2");
System.out.println(" (operands are integers)");
System.out.println(" (operators: + - * /");
@SuppressWarnings("resource")
Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
do{

try{
int result = 0;
int operand1 = 0;
int operand2 = 0;

String operator = "";
char op = ' ';

operand1 = in.nextInt();

operator = in.next();
op = operator.charAt(0);
operand2 = in.nextInt();

switch (op){

    default:
        System.out.println("You didn't insert a proper operator");
        break;
    case '+': result = operand1 + operand2;
        System.out.println("Answer: " + operand1 + ' ' + op + ' ' + operand2 + " = " + result );
        break;

    case '-': result = operand1 - operand2;
        System.out.println("Answer: " + operand1 + ' ' + op + ' ' + operand2 + " = " + result );
        break;

    case '*': result = operand1 * operand2;   
        System.out.println("Answer: " + operand1 + ' ' + op + ' ' + operand2 + " = " + result );
        break;

    case '/': result = operand1 / operand2;   
        System.out.println("Answer: " + operand1 + ' ' + op + ' ' + operand2 + " = " + result );
        break;
        }

}
    catch(ArithmeticException e){
       System.out.println("You can not divide by zero. Input a valid divider.");
    }
    catch (InputMismatchException e) {
      System.out.println("You must use proper numerals.");
  }   
} while(_state == 3);

}
}
share|improve this question
4  
What's the question....? –  CyberneticTwerkGuruOrc Jul 24 '13 at 14:39
    
This console examples I provided where you could re-enter previously invalid values instantly, I need ideas/examples on how to code the calculator to do that. –  John Hunter Jul 24 '13 at 14:48

2 Answers 2

It is considered bad practice to have a giant try block that catches everything. Put the try catch block where you need it.

Also people don't really like doing other's homework for them. If you have a specific problem or question, that is fine, but saying, "i have to do this for an assignment how do I do all of it" probably isn't going to fly.

share|improve this answer
    
First part: noted. Second part: 110% not the situation. –  John Hunter Jul 24 '13 at 15:34

You need to do a few things before completing this. I would recommend creating your own Exceptions by extending the Exception class (or a subclass of Exception class). You can do this by reading the following:

how to create our own exceptions in java

Now say you created MissingOperatorException, then you can throw it in the Switch/Case statements.

try{
    switch (op){

        default:
            System.out.println("You didn't insert a proper operator");
            throw MissingOperatorException;
            break;
        //some more code here
    }
}
//reach catch statements
catch(MissingOperatorException e){
   System.out.println("ERROR MESSAGE");
   //deal with case here by asking for new input
   //use scanner to get operand
   //you can do this by reusing code from above
   System.out.println("Please re-enter operand");
   operator = in.next();
   op = operator.charAt(0);
   //calculate answer again
   //print out answer
}

You'll need to do this for every type of exception you are required to do. I see three possible cases.

  1. missing operator
  2. missing left operand
  3. missing right operand

There could be a combination of these problems, but the Exception handling you write should be able to take care of it as it goes (one by one).

NOTE: You have used the Scanner class to read in the user input. I would assume you understand the basics of Scanner, but your follow up questions contradict that. I would really research on the Java Scanner class. Please check this out:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/io/scanning.html

share|improve this answer
    
The part where you say "//use scanner to get operand", how would I do that? That's the part that had my head spinning for weeks. –  John Hunter Jul 24 '13 at 15:11
    
Just updated my post. You really need to learn how the Scanner class works. –  CyberneticTwerkGuruOrc Jul 24 '13 at 15:23
    
All right, I think I've got a little grasp on the re-entering values part. I'll play around and see what I get. Thanks for the assistance. –  John Hunter Jul 24 '13 at 15:39
    
As long as you can understand my solution in a technical sense, then you're good to go. You can still ask questions. It's just easier for us to help you if you have a more detail question. |=^) –  CyberneticTwerkGuruOrc Jul 24 '13 at 15:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.