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We have a couple of web servers sitting behind a load balancer and firewall. I'm migrating a site over to this set up that uses MongoDB, the site currently sits on a single server with MongoDB installed on the web server. I'm not sure of the best way to proceed with regards to setting up Mongo on the new set up, I've set up mongod instances on both web servers but they currently have their own (independent) data directories and I need them both to be identical all of the time.

I had considered setting up both instances to work from a single data directory on a shared SAN device but then read about replication sets and now think this is the way to go.

I was going to set the instance on one server up as the primary and the instance on the other server as secondary. I understand that it's best to then set up arbiter instance for voting reasons, can this go on either server?

I also understand that the primary instance is the only one accepting writes, is this all handles by MongoDB i.e. will I have to connect to the primary instance (with PHP for example) regardless of which server or could PHP connect to the local instance on both servers and MongoDB handles sending all writes to the current primary instance?

Any advice on other options would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I understand that it's best to then set up arbiter instance for voting reasons, can this go on either server?

This normally comes down to partitioning. As CAP dictates that when there are two equal members on either side of the partition you cannot ensure CAP. What you want to with arbiters is makes sure they create an odd number of members on one side of the partition.

As such, if the partition existed between the servers, putting the arbiter on either would satisfy this need, so yes, it should be ok; however, check your network setup.

connect to the local instance on both servers and MongoDB handles sending all writes to the current primary instance?

Ok I think I understand what your asking. The driver actually keeps a hash map of your replica sets configuration in memory, occasionally refreshing that cached map. It uses this to understand which server to send writes to.

You could connect to a none-primary instance through PHP and so long as the replica members can all see each other (should always be the case) then the driver should be able to map out your replica set, understanding which is primary.

Edit

Now that I re-read what I wrote this part:

What you want to with arbiters is makes sure they create an odd number of members on one side of the partition.

Is wrong. The aim is to make an odd number of nodes allowing for a majority on one side of the partition.

After that things add up again.

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this may have been a good fit for dba.stackexchange.com. – WiredPrairie Jul 24 '13 at 15:22
    
@WiredPrairie true though now that I re-read it I realised I was wrong aobut the odd number, just need a majority on one side, not a odd nmber – Sammaye Jul 24 '13 at 16:36
    
Any reason for the downvote?? – Sammaye Jul 25 '13 at 10:51
    
(Not sure why someone would have down voted, but one could write a very boring and long thesis on why people up/down vote Q&As on StackOverflow, and it still wouldn't make sense! :) ). – WiredPrairie Jul 25 '13 at 11:02
    
@WiredPrairie Heh I'll start writing one ;) – Sammaye Jul 25 '13 at 11:04

A few comments:

First of all, you should not have MongoDB running on the same machine as your web servers. MongoDB (as any other database) likes memory, and MongoDB will actively claim as much memory as it needs. This can starve the resources that the web server needs, or the web server processes can fight back and make MongoDB slow. You really want to have the web servers and MongoDB instances on different servers.

Secondly, you don't set up a MongoDB node as a "primary" or a "secondary". You set them up as nodes and MongoDB sorts out which one is primary and which ones are secondary. An arbiter is neither.

To talk to a MongoDB replica set from PHP, you need to specify a "seedlist" - which should never be just one IP address, but always include more than one (data) node. You want to provide more than one address in case one of them is down. If you're connecting to the node that is down, then PHP can not find the secondary. You also need to specify that you're connecting to a replicaset, such as with:

$m = new MongoClient( 'mongodb://192.168.12.4,192.168.12.5', array( 'replicaSet' => 'myReplSet' );

Although you can place an arbiter on the same node as a data node, you probably would be better of to put it on a web server node. It's okay for an arbiter to be on one as it takes up very little resources.

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Hi Derick, many thanks for your advice. I shall take this into consideration. – olliefinn Jul 25 '13 at 10:20

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