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Working in R. The data tracks changes in brain activity over time. Column "mark" contains information when a particular treatment begins and ends. For examples, the first condition (mark==1) begins in row 3 and ends in row 6. The second experimental condition (mark==2) starts in row 9 and ends in 12. Another batch of treatment one is repeated between rows 15 and 18.

ob.id <- c(1:20)
mark <- c(0,0,1,0,0,1,0,0,2,0,0,2,0,0,1,0,0,1,0,0)
condition<-c(0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,2,2,2,2,0,0,1, 1,1,1,0,0)
start <- data.frame(ob.id,mark)
result<-data.frame(ob.id,mark,condition)
print (start)
> print (start)
   ob.id mark
1      1    0
2      2    0
3      3    1
4      4    0
5      5    0
6      6    1
7      7    0
8      8    0
9      9    2
10    10    0
11    11    0
12    12    2
13    13    0
14    14    0
15    15    1
16    16    0
17    17    0
18    18    1
19    19    0
20    20    0

I need to create a column that would have a dummy variable indicating the membership of an observation in corresponding experimental condition, like this:

> print(result)
   ob.id mark condition
1      1    0         0
2      2    0         0
3      3    1         1
4      4    0         1
5      5    0         1
6      6    1         1
7      7    0         0
8      8    0         0
9      9    2         2
10    10    0         2
11    11    0         2
12    12    2         2
13    13    0         0
14    14    0         0
15    15    1         1
16    16    0         1
17    17    0         1
18    18    1         1
19    19    0         0
20    20    0         0

Thanks for your help!

share|improve this question
    
Is experiment always 4 rows long? –  zx8754 Jul 24 '13 at 16:09
    
no, the experimental conditions would be of various lengths: it's the milliseconds of presenting a particular stimulus. –  andrey Jul 25 '13 at 4:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is a fun little problem. The trick I use below is to first calculate the rle of the mark vector, which makes the problem simpler, as the resulting values vector will always have just one 0 that may or may not need to be replaced (depending on the surrounding values).

# example vector with some edge cases
v = c(0,0,1,0,0,0,1,2,0,0,2,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,1,2,0,2)

v.rle = rle(v)
v.rle
#Run Length Encoding
#  lengths: int [1:14] 2 1 3 1 1 2 1 2 1 4 ...
#  values : num [1:14] 0 1 0 1 2 0 2 0 1 0 ...

vals = rle(v)$values

# find the 0's that need to be replaced and replace by the previous value
idx = which(tail(head(vals,-1),-1) == 0 & (head(vals,-2) == tail(vals,-2)))
vals[idx + 1] <- vals[idx]

# finally go back to the original vector
v.rle$values = vals
inverse.rle(v.rle)
# [1] 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2

Probably the least cumbersome thing to do is to put the above in a function and then apply that to your data.frame vector (as opposed to manipulating the vector explicitly).


Another approach, based on @SimonO101's observation, involves constructing the right groups from the starting data (run the by part separately, piece by piece, to see how it works):

library(data.table)
dt = data.table(start)

dt[, result := mark[1],
     by = {tmp = rep(0, length(mark));
           tmp[which(mark != 0)[c(F,T)]] = 1;
           cumsum(mark != 0) - tmp}]
dt
#    ob.id mark result
# 1:     1    0      0
# 2:     2    0      0
# 3:     3    1      1
# 4:     4    0      1
# 5:     5    0      1
# 6:     6    1      1
# 7:     7    0      0
# 8:     8    0      0
# 9:     9    2      2
#10:    10    0      2
#11:    11    0      2
#12:    12    2      2
#13:    13    0      0
#14:    14    0      0
#15:    15    1      1
#16:    16    0      1
#17:    17    0      1
#18:    18    1      1
#19:    19    0      0
#20:    20    0      0

The latter approach will probably be more flexible.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the heads and tails trick. That was my line of thought too. –  Simon O'Hanlon Jul 24 '13 at 16:11
    
@eddi: What is your t value in the tail/head line? –  sgibb Jul 24 '13 at 16:24
    
@sgibb it's leftovers from testing :) thanks, fixed –  eddi Jul 24 '13 at 16:26
    
thanks @eddi, your rle solution is more transparent and educational for me, but i'd agree that the latter one is more flexible (kudos to @SimonO101!). This did exactly what i needed, and moreover demonstrated the conditional logic i wanted to see an example of for this type of problems. –  andrey Jul 25 '13 at 5:52

Here is one way I could think of doing it:

#  Find where experiments stop and start
ind <- which( result$mark != 0 )
[1]  3  6  9 12 15 18

#  Make a matrix of the start and stop indices taking odd and even elements of the vector
idx <- cbind( head(ind , -1)[ 1:length(ind) %% 2 == 1 ] ,tail( ind , -1)[ 1:length(ind) %% 2 == 1 ] )
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    3    6
[2,]    9   12
[3,]   15   18

edit

I realised making the above index matrix would be easier with just taking odd and even elements:

idx <- cbind( ind[ 1:length(ind) %% 2 == 1 ] , ind[ 1:length(ind) %% 2 != 1 ] )


#  Make vector of row indices to turn to 1's
ones <- as.vector( apply( idx , 1 , function(x) c( x[1]:x[2] ) ) )

#  Make your new column and turn appropriate rows to 1
result$condition <- 0
result$condition[ ones ] <- 1
result
#   ob.id mark condition
#1      1    0         0
#2      2    0         0
#3      3    1         1
#4      4    1         1
#5      5    1         1
#6      6    1         1
#7      7    0         0
#8      8    0         0
#9      9    1         1
#10    10    1         1
#11    11    1         1
#12    12    1         1
#13    13    0         0
#14    14    0         0
#15    15    1         1
#16    16    1         1
#17    17    1         1
#18    18    1         1
#19    19    0         0
#20    20    0         0

Edit

@eddi pointed out I needed to put the value of the experiment in, not just one. So this is another strategy which uses gasp(!) a for loop. This will only be really detrimental if you have millions thousands of experiments (remember to pre-allocate your results vector):

ind <- matrix( which( start$mark != 0 ) , ncol = 2 , byrow = TRUE )
ind <- cbind( ind , start$mark[ ind[ , 1 ] ] )
#     [,1] [,2] [,3]
#[1,]    3    6    1
#[2,]    9   12    2
#[3,]   15   18    1

res <- integer( nrow( start ) )

for( i in 1:nrow(ind) ){
  res[ ind[i,1]:ind[i,2] ] <- ind[i,3]
}
[1] 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 2 2 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0
share|improve this answer
    
I'm still reading your solution, but here's an even simpler option for step 2 matrix(ind, ncol = 2, byrow = T) –  eddi Jul 24 '13 at 16:16
    
@eddi <facepalm> oh man. now I feel stoopid –  Simon O'Hanlon Jul 24 '13 at 16:17
    
+1 for an interesting approach, but you need to fix this somehow to fill in not just 1's –  eddi Jul 24 '13 at 16:19
    
@eddi oh yes, thanks I just saw. I'll have a think.... –  Simon O'Hanlon Jul 24 '13 at 16:27
    
Great stuff, @SimonO101. I ended up using eddi's solution for my particular problem, but this gave me some great demonstration and reference material for the future. thanks for your time! –  andrey Jul 25 '13 at 5:57

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