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I have this piece of code, which is not working:

BigInteger sum = BigInteger.valueOf(0);
for(int i = 2; i < 5000; i++) {
    if (isPrim(i)) {
        sum.add(BigInteger.valueOf(i));
    }
}

The sum variable is always 0. What am I doing wrong?

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By the way, the sum should easily fit in int, so you don't need BigInteger for this example. –  notnoop Nov 23 '09 at 15:51
    
Nope, I changed the code. The number is bigger than 5000. –  cc. Nov 23 '09 at 19:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 68 down vote accepted

BigInteger is immutable. Therefore, you can't change sum, you need to reassign the result of the add method to sum.

sum = sum.add(BigInteger.valueOf(i));

Additionally, re-evaluate your need for BigInteger, a simple int primitive may be enough.

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int will be enough as long as you don't go over 2^31-1, long will be enough as long as you don't go over 2^63-1. –  Jean Hominal Nov 23 '09 at 16:45
2  
Which, in his example, he won't. –  MarkPowell Nov 23 '09 at 16:46
23  
But is it really that hard to think perhaps he simplified his example down to exactly what the problem is? –  thecoshman Jul 24 '13 at 10:46
sum = sum.add(BigInteger.valueOf(i))

The BigInteger class is immutable, hence you can't change its state. So calling "add" creates a new BigInteger, rather than modifying the current.

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Other replies have nailed it; BigInteger is immutable. Here's the minor change to make that code work.

BigInteger sum = BigInteger.valueOf(0);
for(int i = 2; i < 5000; i++) {
    if (isPrim(i)) {
        sum = sum.add(BigInteger.valueOf(i));
    }
}
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BigInteger is an immutable class. So whenever you do any arithmetic, you have to reassign the output to a variable.

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java.math.BigInteger is an immutable class so we can not assign new object in the location of already assigned object. But you can create new object to assign new value like:

sum = sum.add(BigInteger.valueOf(i));
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Since you are summing up some int values together, there is no need to use BigInteger. long is enough for that. int is 32 bit, while long is 64 bit, that can contain the sum of all int values.

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"But is it really that hard to think perhaps he simplified his example down to exactly what the problem is?" (quoting thecoshman) –  Bulwersator Jan 3 at 7:22
    
For this question, my answer is a bit our of scope. Since the topic focus on how to use BigInteger. Just one of my personal experience, if we want to sum up some integers and the numbers are not pretty big, I would prefer long. Because that's easy to use and runs faster. For large scale input, BigInteger is the good choice. –  frank.liu Jan 7 at 6:33

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